Anahad

 

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ANAHAD

– Limitless Sound –

“Vocal music is considered to be the highest, for it is natural; the effect produced by an instrument which is merely a machine cannot be compared with that of the human voice. However perfect strings maybe, they cannot make the same impression on the listener as the voice which comes directly from the soul-breath and has been brought to the surface through the medium of the mind and the vocal organs of the body”.

– Harzat Inayat Khan, The Mysticism of Music, Sound and Word –

 

The combination of architecture, derived from fractal geometry, and the power of sound led to the creation of Anahad. This installation is an interactive musical display, which will be acting as musical instrument giving voice to the burners and the surrounding environment.

Anahad_Day - Small

This art installation, which challenges the perception of nature, is called Anahad. I am planning to build 3 free-standing “trees”, each measuring 1.5m in diameter at the base and 3m at the top. The trees are 5m tall and they are composed of 105 copper pipes or mild metal tubes each measuring 6m long and ranging between 30 and 45mm in diameter. A central column connected to a solid base is the main structural element supporting 2 concentric layers of pipes.

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The most external pipes are bent and perforated and filled with LED strips that will shine through the openings. Every pipe will generate a different sound based on the perforation pattern and the bends. The inner pipes, which are only bent and connected to a propane tank, will spit fire from the top.

ANAHAD - Night - Small

Anahad establishes a connection among the user, the art, and the environment.
Can you recall how the wind blowing sounds? Is it always the same? This design will act as a musical instrument, which will be playable both by burners and the Playa itself.
During nighttime, the user will be transported both visually and sensorially into a digital forest through a LED light show mimicking sun rays penetrating the forest treetops. Then flames will be shooting out from the top to mark every hour.
The aim of this installation is to create an uninterrupted musical performance, combining the sounds produced by burners hitting the pipes or by the wind blowing through the pipes. The central space between the three trees and the niches at their base will provide a space to meditate and be mindful of the soundless sound of the Playa. This installation in its simplicity will connect people and natural environment through the use of musical harmony.

Anahad

Anahad is solely an instrument through which the breath of the Playa will blow, singing for the burners. Vice versa, burners will be able to express themselves striking the metal pipes playing melodies for the community and the surroundings.
This installation aims to connect the people to the Playa. The three “trees” are a digital fabricated representation of a natural forest. In a world where disconnecting from reality becomes a luxury, where innovation takes over simplicity, and nature gets left aside in our busy lives, music is what makes us human. Anahad challenges the way we experience reality, by combining the digital and virtual world with the natural environment. The aim is to provide the participants with an ideal environment for them to meditate in and be mindful of their whole experience.

dis|integration[loops]

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dis/integration[loops], inspired by the composer William Basinski’s seminal works of the same name, explores the limitations of digital processes in our world – and the chaos that can unfold from overreliance on them.

A towering array is assembled from recursive fragments of an inherently destructive process. It explores the tension that exists between the digital and physical realms; challenging an immortal, digital world, the glorious ruin of the analogue realm confronts the perceived perfection of the artificial.

Existing in a state of intended incompleteness, dis/integration[loops] eschews vanity in favour of exhibiting procedural rawness; the power of ruinous accident reveals itself through the tarnishing of idyllic digitalism.

Pressure-laminated plywood modules, form-found through iterative casting experiments, connect to form a pervious, fragmented structure; it’s transcience and impermanence exaggerated as night follows day.

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In the same way that Basinski’s fragile recordings were destroyed upon being processed by the human ear, dis/integration[loops] exists in a contented, lush and shimmering state prior to being activated by human presence.

Proximity-controlled LED lighting impregnates the structure. When combined with sounds inspired by those Basinski’s (de)generative process created, this affords a level of animated deconstruction upon activation; visually and sonically, the imperfect presence of humanity causes dis/integration[loops] to be engulfed in chaotic ripples of distortion.

It’s most perfect (yet still decidedly imperfect) state is one in which it lies dormant and peaceful, undiscovered by the presence of people. It experientially disintegrates upon activation.

The fragmented structure exaggerates ever-changing natural light conditions and provides shelter, as well as an intimate, tactile space withi it’s permeable walls.

‘And then as the last crackle faded and the music was no more, I took in my surroundings and looked around at the faces and I was right there with everybody and we were alive.’

dis/integration[loops] is a reminder than everything we encounter eventually falls apart and returns to dust. It challenges the perfect, edited, occularcentrism that blights our social lives, explores the sound of decay, and the beauty that can exist in destruction. It is a meditation on death and loss, and exploration on a theme that some things are better left untouched.

The experience of life – a gradual disintegration – is simultaneously enriched and eroded by the imperfect nature of our encounters; pristine digitalism deserves a tarnished, ruinous quality symbolic of our experiences.

‘and I was right there with everybody and we were alive.’