Andrew Kudless: P-Wall

Andrew Kudless (a.k.a. Matsys) demonstrates the parametric  techniques used to design the P-Wall and the building techniques used to actually physically create it. The project as such and especially it’s form might be interesting to anyone who is fascinated by Frei Otto’s pneumatic structures.

Photograph of the P-Wall taken from the MATSYS website

Situ Solar

[top to bottom: Solar Pavillion1, 2 and 3]

Situ Studio is a New York-based design practice that engages in experimental work and material investigations and maintains a parallel operation as as a digital fabrication and design consultancy.

The Solar Pavillions are series of pavilions designed by Situ Studio that ‘explore indeterminate construction systems that are shaped by sustainable building pratices…to create a set of parts that are easy to assemble through a set of localised construction rules. The flexible structural logic allows for a wide range of configurations…Manufactured with a zero-waste mandate, these designs explore methods for producing reconfigurable temporary structures at a low cost and low environmental impact’

http://www.situstudio.com/

Printing Food

Fast Company has published an article on printing food which talks about the Cornell Machines Lab‘s work and more specifically Jeffrey Lipton‘s group.  The latter looks at how Solid Free Form Technology (SFF) will “fundamentally change the ways we produce and experience food”. They have published a paper called “Hydrocolloid Printing: A Novel Platform for Customized Food Production” explaining the main advantages of this technique which are mainly artistic, allowing experimental Chefs to create new dishes which could not have been done before. Laypeople could print these new creations from home too.

CNN Money‘s website shows one of these machines used by the French Culinary Institute.

The Printing Food Project is part of larger group, the Fab@Home which aims to make 3D printers and other new fabrication technology affordable to everyone.

The Printer with two different eatable ink

A printer in action as shown on the CNN video at the French Culinary Institute