Terra – Reef

Located directly North of Kings Cross Station, this project follows a set of design principles aiming to tackle global warning and greenhouse gas emissions namely carbon dioxide and nitrous oxide.

Terra – Reef aims to focus on the intrinsic relationships between communities and architecture by introducing a sustainable bio-receptive terracotta system to improve the local pollution and quality of health of the community.

The bio-receptive qualities of terracotta allow Moss and Lichen to proliferate on the surface of the material, supporting their growth over time. The moss inhabited structure will passively absorb PM2.5 from the adjacent trains and capture CO2 from the atmosphere.

In order to tackle rising UK and global fertiliser prices the programmes within this project actively remove Nitrous Oxide from the atmosphere and convert it into ammonia fertiliser to support the vertical farming harvest and boost the socio-economic output of the architecture and the local community.

SCOBY FAB-TORY

In order to tackle the use of single use plastics in the UK this project will use waste consumables to produce bio-degradable alternatives to single use plastics.

SCOBY (Symbiotic Culture of Bacteria and Yeast) is a bio-fabric and by-product of Kombucha Tea. SCOBY Fab-tory manufactures this bio-fabric, using it to creates food packaging, SCOBY based insulation and rolls of raw membranes using food waste.

The project is situated in York Way, making use of wasted space above the train tracks just north of Kings Cross, St. Pancras Stations.

BioBreathe

BioBreathe – a biomachine at the Old Oak Common Station

The project ‘BioBreathe’ proposes an innovative way to integrate biogas technology into mobile architecture, in order to encourage the use of renewable energy in households and educate the public about waste removal alternatives. The biomachine consists of curved wood panels with detailed cuts acting as skin, which will move along with the naturally contracting and expanding movements of anaerobic digestion, simulating the chest movement of breath in and out. It functions as a portable unit which can be assembled anywhere to transform waste collected into energy.

Anaerobic digestion occurs naturally, in the absence of oxygen, as bacteria break down organic materials and produce biogas. The process reduces the amount of material and produces biogas effectively, which can be used as an energy source. It is relatively cheap compared to other sustainable energy and easy to set up even in domestic settings. A household biogas plant is approximately 1000 pounds which can provide adequate daily cooking gas and fertilizers to a family. With simple operation and distinct output, it will surely increase awareness of the novel sustainable solutions.

The expandable skin is first experimented with paper models, then tested on thin plywood sheets in the fabrication lab at school. Being a postgraduate student in the University of Westminster, it will be a precious experience to build and publicize my own design. It will be a showcase for sustainable architecture that gathers talented design students to join the team of fabricating the structure.

The machine is initiated by inserting waste into the digester , gas created will go through a gas pressure mechanism and active filter, then released by a gas pipe to provide energy for a burning flame. The wood skin follows the movement of the gas holder, expanding when more gas is collected, vice versa. The structure is scalable, which can be developed into a larger plant to provide energy for communities. 

To increase engagement of the community, BioBreathe is proposed to be built at the Old Oak Common Railway Station, which will offer unrivalled connectivity to the high speed two railway. The expected high flow of circulation will furthermore promote the project and impact the society.

BIO-bubble

Modular Inflatable Air Purifying Structure

BIO-bubble is a modular, inflatable, air purifying structure. It comprises of recycled, 3D printed bio-plastic tubes, with ETFE pillows cushioned between. The tubes act as microalgae bio-reactors, which are encased within a second tube which keeps air circulating to the recycled ETFE cushions.

Majority of the structure is air, water, and air-purifying microalgae, creating an efficient, ecological bio structure.

The structure comprises of inter-connecting modules which can have different functions. They can act as an inflatable structure that people can walk through, and kids can play inside. The modules can also act as a greenhouse, with the dark, water-filled base acting as a heat sink. The heat stored during the day from solar energy is released at night to maintain a warm environment for the plants within.

It is a showcase for sustainable novel design solutions, which is accessible to public. 

Because the structure is so lightweight, it can be assembled easily in any location, allowing different local communities to interact with it. The lightness of the structure means it has a low in embodied carbon and minimizes emissions associated with transportation, installation and dismantling. It can also be scaled up or down.

The microalgae growing within the structure can be harvested to be used for various bio-materials or bio-fuel.