Occupy the Buffer Zone

Final Design Thesis:

Cyprus 1974: The forced geographical separation of the two main communities of the island, the Turkish Cypriots and Greek Cypriots, today have been developed back to back, creating two realities separated but joined by the third space, the Buffer Zone. Because of the lack of a political solution to be given the “Occupy” movement of  Cyprus, have joined forces to set up camp inside the buffer zone demanding reunification. A network from different types of people with different backgrounds from both communities co-oporate on site to create an actual and symbolic bridge. The assembly components are made out of waste timber found around the surrounding timber workshops. It is an emergent system that comes to life through a bicommunal effort to make their own style of living , and in that way becomes symbolic. The project is based on a time based growth of occupation in order to adapt to the expansion in time, across the streets and the buildings of the area rejoinning the two communities.

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No man’s land Project

Cyprus 1974: A War

Since 1974 the political act of partition on the island has been manifested as a rapidly erected and expedient physical partition. The forced geographical separation of the two main communities of the island, the Turkish Cypriots and Greek Cypriots, today have been developed back to back, creating two realities separated but joined by the third space, the Buffer Zone. Since then, the Cyprus Problem has remain unsolved  and the faith of the land and properties laying inside the Buffer zone remains uncertain.

2012: Famagousta “The Ghost city of Europe”.

Every four or five years since 1974 the issue of opening the abandoned and fenced city, that lies inside the Buffer Zone of Cyprus, is brought forward. The discussion is based on the argument whether the city should be returned right away in its current condition to its inhabitants or it should be kept fenced for some years more in order to be restored and  rebuild, since after 37 years of abandonment virtually all its infrastructure, if not the whole built environment, is not reusable and beyond repair.

The no-man’s land project  is an architectural case study and a future challenge for Cyprus which is based on the hypothetical return of the abandoned and fenced city of Famagousta to its former inhabitants and beyond. It brings an opportunity  for an innovative urban space. Different teams under the umbrella of the Project explore different scenarios for the future of the city worth to look at.