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Lorna Jackson_Reflection_Interior Visual

Reflection presents this years burners with an intimate setting in which to share their inner most confessions, secrets and tales – With the option to do so both openly with other burners face to face, or retain the mystery of their identity by sharing with a complete stranger through the pavilions semi private screen. Reflection embodies the theme ‘Carnival of Mirrors’ in a variety of manners:- the geometry of the pavilion not only mirrors itself in its own form, but also incorporates a reflective surface within its interior spaces. The reflective physicality of the pavilion beautifully juxtaposes its function, by giving its burners a physical platform with which to cogitate their innermost thoughts and feelings, and share these with others. The pavilion is created as a result of rigorous testing of origami in order to create a single Spiralhedron which is then mirrored through along all axis.
Lorna Jackson_Reflection_Plan ElevLorna Jackson_Reflection_sections

Based upon a geometric origami principle which outlines the rules for the triangular subdivision of a 2-dimensional shape and assigns mountain and valleys creases to each subsequent subdivision the Spiralhedron has been optimised through both digital and physical testing. Reflection takes an abstract approach to this years theme, the pavilion’s form manifests itself as a result of mirroring this singular Spiralhedron in the X,Y and Z axis, which in turn creates its enclosing plywood form. In order to create the semi-private confessional screen, the panels incorporate a pattern, providing both the function of privacy, but also narrating the origins of the pavilions final form.

Lorna Jackson_Reflection_Meta Diagram_PNGLorna Jackson_Reflection_constructionLorna Jackson_Reflection_Large Model_thin

The principles of Burning Man are carefully considered, by providing an interactive base for participation that is never fully accomplished without the burners involvement. By sharing their stories, burners create a unique experience manifested through the ideals of trust and sharing, which facilitates a special bond between the burners. Upon its burning at the end of the festival, ‘Reflection’ becomes a resting place for the confessions, secrets and stories of its burners, allowing new bonds to be formed.Lorna Jackson_Reflection_detailLorna Jackson_Reflection_Small Modelthin

Construction

Due to form being created through the act of mirroring the entire pavilion will be made of 9 unique laser cut panels which will be bolted together with both metal hinges and 90 degrees and wooden brackets at 135 degrees.

Lorna Jackson_Reflection_Daytime Visual

Dimensions

Constrained by the size of a plywood sheet each individual Spiralhedron is made of two sheets of plywood (requiring 16 in total). Made of eight spiralhedrons ‘Reflection’ has a footprint of 3.5metres*3.5metres with a maximum height of 3.5m creating a footprint equal to that of the height of the pavilion.

Very enjoyable crit day for DS10 at Westminster University. It was our second cross-crit of the year and students showed their proposal for Brief2A, building an interactive structure for Burning Man or the festival of their choice.

Thank you very much to our helpful crits Harri Lewis (Ramboll RCD our engineers for last year’s Shipwreck and Fractal Cult), Marie-Isabel de Monseignat (Tutor at DRS1 Chelsea College of Art), Dusan Decermic, Anthony Boulanger and Katherine Herron. Here are couple pictures:

Marie de Monseignat is holding the Plywood Spiralohedrons

Marie de Monseignat is holding the Plywood Spiralohedrons

Jessica Beagleman's Plywood Spiralohedrons

Jessica Beagleman’s Plywood Spiralohedrons

Sarah Shuttleworth's large metal origami model.

Sarah Shuttleworth’s large metal origami model.

Paul Thorpe's Twisting Plywood pods 1:1 Model

Paul Thorpe’s Twisting Plywood pods 1:1 Model

Ieva Ciocyte's Burning Euclid Wall

Ieva Ciocyte’s Burning Euclid Wall

Joe Leach's Burning Seed Reciprocal Structure

Joe Leach’s Burning Seed Reciprocal Structure

Sarah Stell's wind powered animals

Sarah Stell’s wind powered animals

Josh Haywood's beautiful Digital Muqarnas

Josh Haywood’s beautiful Digital Muqarnas

Henry Turner's intersecting plywood wave structure.

Henry Turner’s intersecting plywood wave structure.

Will Garforth-Bless' bamboo and fabric hypars

Will Garforth-Bless’ bamboo and fabric hypars

Lorna Jackson's Spacer Fabric Cloud

Lorna Jackson’s Spacer Fabric Cloud

Charlotte Yates' Origami Roofs

Charlotte Yates’ Origami Roofs

Naomi Danos' Folding roofs.

Naomi Danos’ Folding roofs.

Mark Simpson's mirror diamonds in the desert.

Mark Simpson’s mirror diamonds in the desert.

We’re back from the desert! Very proud to have completed two beautiful projects at the Burning Man festival 2013 with our DS10 students and guests from the Architectural Association, Columbia University and UCL.

Credits to the team:

Team: Toby Burgess and Arthur Mamou-Mani a.k.a. Ratchet and Baby Cup (Project Directors), Thanasis Korras (Designer of Fractal Cult), Georgia Rose Collard-Watson (Designer of Shipwreck), Jessica Beagleman (Food & Meals), Natasha Coutts (Camp and Rentals), Sarah Shuttlesworth, Andy Rixson,  Luka Kreze, Tim Strnad, Philippos Philippidis, Nataly Matathias, Marina Karamali, Harikleia Karamali, Antony Joury, Emma Whitehead, , Jo Cook, Caitlin Hudson, Dan Dodds and Chris Ingram.

Engineers: Ramboll Computational Design (RCD) –  Stephen Melville, Harri Lewis, James Solly

Suppliers: Hess Precision (Plywood Laser Cutting), One-to-Metal, (Metal Punching and Folding), Safway (Scaffolding), West Coast Netting (Netting)

Special Thanks: BettieJune, Ben Stoelting, Kevin Meers, Caroline Holmes, Chloe Brubaker, Papa Bear,

Photos by Jo Cook, Arthur Mamou-Mani, Toby Burgess, Luka Kreze, Thanasis Korras, Antony Joury. 

Back view Just before burning Shipwreck

Back view Just before burning Shipwreck

Front view of the Fractal Cult timber pods and Scaffolding

Front view of the Fractal Cult timber pods and Scaffolding

Here are couple more pictures of the finished projects:

A view of the Shipwreck with the man and a fish Art Car

A view of the Shipwreck with the man and a fish Art Car

Enjoying the sun on the shipwreck - back view

Enjoying the sun on the shipwreck – back view

Three french burners on the hammock

Three french burners on the hammock

A burner relaxing on the Fractal Cult scaffolding

A burner relaxing on the Fractal Cult scaffolding

View of timber pods and festival in background

View of timber pods and festival inbackground

View of timber pods with shipwreck and man in background

View of timber pods with shipwreck and man in background

Interior of the Fractal Cult during Day time

Interior of the Fractal Cult during Day time

Fractal Cult at night time

Fractal Cult at night time

Some images of the construction of Shipwreck, from the collection of the pieces all the way to the assembly

The group in front of Shipwreck

The group in front of Shipwreck

Shipwreck building Burning Man 2013

Construction process, the shipwreck hammock cantilever being erected

Construction process, the shipwreck hammock cantilever being erected

A view of the construction before adding the hammock strips

A view of the construction before adding the hammock strips

Building the shipwreck - finishing the cave part.

Building the shipwreck – finishing the cave part.

All the Shipwreck parts unrolled on the desert floor before assembly

All the Shipwreck parts unrolled on the desert floor before assembly

The shipwreck flat packed in the 24ft truck.

The shipwreck flat packed in the 24ft truck.

Images of the construction process of Fractal Cult until the burn:

Burning Man 2013

Burning Fractal Cult in the Communal Burn

Toby, Luka and Tim assembling the scaffolding for Fractal cult

Toby, Luka and Tim assembling the scaffolding for Fractal cult

Fractal Cult's scaffolding assembly is based on this smaller physical model

Fractal Cult’s scaffolding assembly is based on this smaller physical model

The scaffolding being assembled in the middle of the pods

The scaffolding being assembled in the middle of the pods

Assembling the first pod

Assembling the first pod

The Fractal Cult pods being assembled.

The Fractal Cult pods being assembled.

Getting the ground anchors in for the pods

Getting the ground anchors in for the pods

Getting the scaffolding in the 24ft truck

Getting the scaffolding in the 24ft truck

Finally, how we made our camp look more like a home and less like a refugee camp:

Our camp as it looked at the end

Our camp as it looked at the end

Protecting ourselves from a dust storm!

Protecting ourselves from a dust storm!

Assembling the Hexayurts

Assembling the Hexayurts

The group in our kitchen

The group in our kitchen

One of our two food runs in Reno - Feeding 20 people in the desert.

One of our two food runs in Reno – Feeding 20 people in the desert.

Getting the camp from a lockup in Reno

Getting the camp from a lockup in Reno

A beautiful view of the festival itself at sunrise:

Burning Man Camps and Playa at Sunrise

Burning Man Camps and Playa at Sunrise

Here is a text that we wrote about the experience:

Diploma Studio 10:
Diploma Studio 10 at the University of Westminster is led by Toby Burgess and Arthur Mamou-Mani. They both believe that involvement is key to the process of learning and therefore always try to get their students to “get out and build” their designs in the real world. The studio starts the year with the study of systems, natural, mathematical and architectural systems of all sort, paired with intense software training in order to build up skills and a set of rules to design a small scale project which they will be able to build during a real event in the summer. Throughout the year, they build large scale prototypes and draw very accurate technical drawings, they also need to provide a budget and explain how it makes sense within the wider context of the festival, some of them will event start crowd-funding campaign to self-finance the projects. Our ultimate goal is to give them an awareness of entrepreneurship in Architecture and how to initiate projects as this is for us the best way to fight unemployment in our profession.
Burning Man and the 10 Principles:
The Burning Man festival takes place every summer in Black Rock desert, Nevada. It is a “participant-led” festival in which the activities are initiated by the people attending it. There are around 60,000 “burners” every year building a giant temporary city in which they create a social experiment which follows the 10 principles of Burning Man. They conclude the festival by burning a large sculpture of a Man.
What interested Toby and Arthur are the 10 principle which guide the “burners”: Radical Self-Reliance, Radical Inclusion, Gifting, Leaving No trace, to name a few. Designing with these rules in mind help students understand basic issues of sustainability. Designing for Burning Man also helps the students to design with “playfulness” in mind, as all the structures have to be climbable and interactive. We are not the only one inspired by these rules, Sergei Brin, co-founder of Google, asks all his staff to follow the principles when they come up with new ideas.
The Story:
On our first year at Westminster we found out that our student could submit their Burning Man proposals and receive a grant from the organizers. After receiving 20 submissions from the same school, the organizers were very intrigued and decided to contact us. The director of the Art Grant told us that she loved the project but that all of them were just not possible in the context. She decided to visit us in London to explain what we could do to submit better projects the following year which we did. On the second run, the festival chose two projects, Shipwreck by Georgia Rose Collard-Watson and Fractal Cult by Thanasis Korras.
These two projects are representative of the way we run our studio: Thanasis looked at Fractal on Brief01 and Georgia looked at ways to bend and assemble strips of wood together. They both explored these systems before submitting a project with a very strong narrative which fitted perfectly the burning man philosophy. Thanasis linked his Fractal to the symbol of “Merkaba” whereas Georgia told the story of a shipwreck which offered shelter from the dust storms.
Once the project got chosen, we partnered with an engineer, Ramboll and started researching for suppliers and fabrication facilities in the USA. We took the 3D files from concept all the way parametric models for fabrication. We started a Gantt chart with every step to take from rental of 24ft truck, collection of item all the way to demolition.
One of the main aspect that required a lot of planning was the camp. We had to plan every meal and food that would not perish under the extreme condition. We also found a way to rent a whole camp equipment from past burners.
On site:
The team grew little by little, many of our student could not afford the trip or could not take such a long time off so we asked around if anyone else would like to join us and thanks to our blog posts and active social networking online, students from the Architectural Association, Columbia or UCL started showing interest and joined the team.
Our first surprise on site was the power of the dust storm. One of our Yurt flew away and some of us got stuck in different places of the site seeking shelter. We were terrorised. Sleeping in tents was also extremely hard as you would be awaken by temperatures approaching 40degrees celcius, at the end of the construction, a lot of us would sleep in the foam hexayurts in which we were storing equipment at first.
We learned so much.

Hello! Couple technical updates on our Burning Man Projects for the team, donators and potential collaborators:

  • We have developed the structure, geometry and details of the two projects with the help of Ramboll Computational Design (RCD). See drawings and analysis below.
  • We have signed the contract with Burning Man and received the first grant payment 20 of us are signed in to go.
  • We have sent our first fabrication files to get an initial quote on CNC milling all the pieces on 2440mm x 1220mm exterior grade plywood sheets of 9mm (for Fractal Cult) and 3mm (For Shipwreck). Our hope is to collect the pieces on the 19th August.
  • We will start small models to test the new structures
  • The Shipwreck now has a parametric model which outputs all the cutting profiles.

Please help us continue the work, even £10 helps – Donate Now

You can also comment on this page to make suggestions on the fabrication – We need more quotes for the CNC and/or Laser cutting job in the U.S. West Coast (Los Angeles, San Francisco, Las Vegas, Sacramento, Fresno, Reno preferably) . We also need quotes for the scaffolding structure.

Stephen Melville of Ramboll RCD sketch for the Shipwreck structure

Stephen Melville of Ramboll RCD sketch for the Shipwreck structure

Shipwreck - Looking at different Versions with Parametric model

Shipwreck – Looking at different Versions with Parametric model

Shipwreck - Looking at different Versions with Parametric model

Shipwreck – Looking at different Versions with Parametric model

Shipwerck - Low View

Shipwerck – Low View

ShipWreck View from above

ShipWreck View from above

Current Profiles for Shipwreck

Current Profiles for Shipwreck

Current Laser cut Profiles for Fractal Cult

Current Laser cut Profiles for Fractal Cult

Hinged Connection for Fractal Cult by Thanasis Korras with Ramboll

Hinged Connection for Fractal Cult by Thanasis Korras with Ramboll

Ramboll's suggestion for Fractal Cult's Scafolding structure

Ramboll’s suggestion for Fractal Cult’s Scafolding structure

Fractal Cult Build Plan

Fractal Cult Build Plan

Fractal Cult Build Plan

Fractal Cult Build Plan

Ramboll Ground Reaction Wind Analysis

Ramboll Ground Reaction Wind Analysis

Great Thursday tutorials at Westminster! Thank you to former DS10 students George HintzenJoe Magri and Chris Mount for their presentation on their trip to the Burning Man festival last summer. We have just started Brief02: Template. Students will start designing a temporary structure for the Burning Man festival or an Open-Source Construction Set.

Above: Jessica Beagelman’s beautiful laser-cut plywood experiments

Above: William Garforth-Bless scanned his ferofluid and will turn them into inhabitable fountains

Above: Sarah Shuttleworth’s beautiful swarm generated wood structures

Above: George Hintzen, Joe Magri and Chris Mount presenting their Burning Man experience


Ecovative are a New York based research group who are growing a new material using fungi. The process uses an organic aggregate, such as seed husk or other agricultural / industrial by products, as its base. This aggregate is mixed with mycelium fungi and packed into a former to give it the desired geometry. Being a loose aggregate it will fill any former created. The mixture is then left for several days, over which time the fungi grows into a microscopic web of fibres which bond the aggregate into a solid mass. This growth requires no water, light or petrochemical inputs. Every cubic inch of material contains a matrix of 8 miles of tiny mycelial fibres. At the end of the process, they put the materials through a dehydration and heat treating process to stop the growth. This final process ensures that there will never be any spores or allergen concerns.
The company are currently exploring applications of the material in multiple industries from packaging and consumer products to architecture and automotive manufacture. They are also looking for potential partners with which to develop aspects of the material further.

More info: http://www.ecovativedesign.com/