2021-2022 BRIEF: ECO-PARAMETRIC ARCHITECTURE

At the start of the year, coupled with Grasshopper training we will be looking at lattices as a granular spatial organising principle. From molecular systems to quasi-crystals, nature organizes itself through space efficient, resilient and complex arrangements.


We’re back!!!

ECO-PARAMETRIC ARCHITECTURE

Excited to share with you our new brief:

A4 BRIEF
Studio Intro Slides

Brief 01: 3D Lattices/ Urban Crystallography & Self-Sufficient Bio-Machines:
At the start of the year, coupled with Grasshopper training we will be looking at lattices as a granular spatial organising principle. From molecular systems to quasi-crystals, nature organizes itself through space efficient, resilient and complex arrangements. We would like to start the year with a study of all these three-dimensional systems as an exercise to understand the many ways structures can be arranged in space. Using timber struts and nodes, or surfaces and hinges, whether defining space packing volumes or porous three dimensional grid shells, the modularity of the systems allows us to work at all scales. However for the first brief we expect you to design and build a self-sufficient small scale bio-machine interacting with the given sites. Like a tree absorbing carbon whilst creating timber and fruits, your architectural system will be a blend of technology and nature in the urban context.

Ghee Beom Kim‘s 3D lattice
A Cascade of Water Over Terra Cotta Tubes Functions as a Beautiful  Low-Energy Air Conditioner | Colossal
 Ant Studio‘s clay air conditioning alternative

Brief 02: Eco-Parametric Urban Infrastructures to combat climate change
Nature does not make waste, everything is reused and feeds back into the system. DS10 will learn from this by applying the principles of permaculture, regenerative agriculture and renewable energy generation to propose Eco-Parametric Urban Infrastructures. You will design and test large scale infrastructures tightly interwoven into and above the urban fabric of London’s train tracks which immersively integrate nature into the city using your 3D lattices as a reference.  We are seeking new architectural ideas which address energy needs in the age of the circular economy. Your mixed use infrastructure will create energy and deal with its waste to close the loop whilst helping people live better and healthier lives and create an economy in the process. Proposals may include self sufficient communities and economies, cradle to cradle business ideas, inhabited bridges forging connections between different sides of the tracks and structures which actively contribute to the area such as carbon capture devices, solar collectors, pollution scrubbers etc,

 Zainab Kahn, The Spirulina Bank

Site: The underused spaces over the existing railway tracks of central London will form the foundations for exciting large scale mixed use structures, creating new connections and a new hyper dense and hyper sustainable urban fabric.

Output: Rather than a traditional paper portfolio we will focus on digital representation techniques such as animations, high quality digital renders which explain the process of your work. You will become a member of the WeWantToLearn.net community (1.7 million viewers) sharing your research and studio submissions to inspire and contribute to the wider design community. Blog posts will form part of your portfolio submission.

ECO PARAMETRIC YOUTUBE CHANNEL:
https://youtube.com/playlist?list=PL-4o26NPHVJC2sNHob8G_RDYxL6lZVhhr

Zainab Kahn, The Spirulina Bank
Nikola Wolkova, Rewilding Tensegrity
This year’s site: London’s Train Tracks

Growth From The Ger

Introduction

‘Growth From The Ger’ seeks to analyse the vernacular structure of the traditional nomad home and use parametric thinking to create a deployable structure that can grow by modular.

‘Ger’ meaning ‘home’ is a Mongolian word which describes the portable dwelling. Commonly known as a ‘yurt’, a Turkish word, the yurt offered a sustainable lifestyle for the nomadic tribes of the steppes of Central Asia. It allowed nomads to migrate seasonally, catering to their livestock, water access and in relation to the status of wars/conflicts. An ancient structure, it has developed in material and joinery, however the concept prominently remaining the same.

Inspiration

Growing up in London, I fell in love with the transportable home when I first visited Mongolia at the age of 17. The symmetrical framework and circulating walls create a calm and peaceful environment. In the winter it keeps the cold out and in the summer keeps the heat out. The traditional understanding of placement and ways of living within it, which seems similar to a place of worship, builds upon the concept of respect towards life and its offerings.

Understanding the beauty of the lifestyle, I also understand the struggles that come with it and with these in mind, I wanted to explore ways of solving it whilst keeping the positives of the lifestyle it offers.

Pros: Deployable, transportable, timber, vernacular, can be assembled and dissembled by one family, can vary in size/easily scaleable depending on user, low maintenance, sustainable, autonomous.

Cons: Difficult to sustain singularly, not water proof, no privacy, no separation of space, low ceiling height, can’t attach gers together, low levels of security.

A digital render produced on Rhino, showing the steps of building a ger in elevation.

Lattice Analysis and Testing

To understand the possibilities of the lattice wall, I created a 1:20 plywood model using 1mm fishing wire as the joinery. This created various circular spirals and curves. The loose fit of the wire within the holes of timber pieces allowed such curves to happen and created an expanding body. The expansion and flexible joinery allows it to cover a wider space in relation to the amount of material used.

A series of photos showing the expansion and various curves of the lattice model.

I created the same latticework at 1:2 scale to see if the same curvature was created.

1:2 plywood model testing flexible joinery and curvature at large scale.

Locking the curve to create a habitable space. I did this by changing the types of joints in different parts of the structure.

A series of images showing the deployment of the structure and locked into place.

To create a smoother and more beautiful curve I change the baton to a dowel and densify the structure.

Model photo of curve in full expansion.

To lock the lattice curve in expansion I extrude legs that meet the ground and tie together.

Model photo of curve in full expansion and locked in place.

Manufacturing and assembly

Diagram of the construction sequence of model.
A series of photos showing 1:2 scale model being deployed.
1:2 prototype made from 18mmx18mm square plywood sticks joined together by twine.

The model made from sheet plywood cost approximately £30 and took one working day to make for one person. However, a more sustainable material and process needed to be considered as the process of making plywood contradicted this.

Photo showing the modular growth of the module. Models made from 18x18mm square sticks of softwood timber and joined together with twine.

This model can be made by one person with the use of a wood workshop. The timber pieces were bought at 18mm x 95mm x 4200mm, 13 pieces of these were enough to make three modules, roughly costing £170 in total. Each module takes approximately 5 hours to construct, this involves the tying of the measured length twine joints. The structure is lightweight and each module is easily transportable by one person.

Growth from the ger: modular growth

Digital render of modules arrayed together at angles, produced on Grasshopper and Rhino.
Perspective view.
Digital render of modules arrayed together at angles, produced on Grasshopper and Rhino.
Perspective view.
Digital render of modules arrayed together at angles, produced on Grasshopper and Rhino.
Plan view.
Digital render of modules arrayed together at angles, produced on Grasshopper and Rhino.
Diagram showing the plan functions of each space and modules.

Thursday 12th December 2013

We just finished our last tutorials of the first term! Congratulations to all the students for the great three months and looking forward to the remaining two terms.

Students completed both briefs (brief01:systems and brief2A:festival) and are starting the case studies of events as part of our last brief (brief2B:realise).

Here are couple pictures of the projects we have seen during the last tutorials. Where do you suggest building the structures over the summer?

Merry Christmas & best wishes for the New Year!!

John Konings's towering gridshell.
John Konings’s towering gridshell.

John Konings's towering gridshell.
John Konings’s towering gridshell.

John Konings's towering gridshell.
John Konings’s towering gridshell.

Andres Jippa's 3D prints, driven by Chaos theory's strange attractors.
Andres Jippa’s 3D prints, driven by Chaos theory’s strange attractors.

Andres Jippa's 3D prints, driven by Chaos theory's strange attractors.
Andres Jippa’s 3D prints, driven by Chaos theory’s strange attractors.

Andres Jippa's 3D prints, driven by Chaos theory's strange attractors.
Andres Jippa’s 3D prints, driven by Chaos theory’s strange attractors.

Andres Jippa's 3D prints, driven by Chaos theory's strange attractors.
Andres Jippa’s 3D prints, driven by Chaos theory’s strange attractors.

Andres Jippa's 3D prints, driven by Chaos theory's strange attractors.
Andres Jippa’s 3D prints, driven by Chaos theory’s strange attractors.

Andres Jippa's 3D prints, driven by Chaos theory's strange attractors. Construction Component.
Andres Jippa’s 3D prints, driven by Chaos theory’s strange attractors. Construction Component.

Henry Turner's Curved Intersecting Plywood Wave Structure
Henry Turner’s Curved Intersecting Plywood Wave Structure

Ieva Ciocyte's Flame Tower made of Intersecting plywood components
Ieva Ciocyte’s Flame Tower made of Intersecting plywood components

Sarah Shuttleworth's Moebius Strips made of Steel Stars.
Sarah Shuttleworth’s Moebius Strips made of Steel Stars.

William Garforth-Bless' Bamboo Hammock Amphitheatre
William Garforth-Bless’ Bamboo Hammock Amphitheatre

William Garforth-Bless' Bamboo Hammock Amphitheatre
William Garforth-Bless’ Bamboo Hammock Amphitheatre