21st November 2013 Tutorials

Another great tutorial day this Thursday. Here are two projects that are materializing into beautiful models. The first project is by Sarah Shuttleworth, it is a simple folded component which drives a curved surface that is used both as furniture and shelter, the other project by Henry Turner is a series of intersecting plywood waves which create a playful landscape on which people can lounge.

Polypropelene Modular Origami by Sarah Shuttleworth
Polypropelene Modular Origami by Sarah Shuttleworth
Intersecting plywood waves by Henry Turner
Intersecting plywood waves by Henry Turner

Building Fractal Cult and Shipwreck at Burning Man 2013

We’re back from the desert! Very proud to have completed two beautiful projects at the Burning Man festival 2013 with our DS10 students and guests from the Architectural Association, Columbia University and UCL.

Credits to the team:

Team: Toby Burgess and Arthur Mamou-Mani a.k.a. Ratchet and Baby Cup (Project Directors), Thanasis Korras (Designer of Fractal Cult), Georgia Rose Collard-Watson (Designer of Shipwreck), Jessica Beagleman (Food & Meals), Natasha Coutts (Camp and Rentals), Sarah Shuttlesworth, Andy Rixson,  Luka Kreze, Tim Strnad, Philippos Philippidis, Nataly Matathias, Marina Karamali, Harikleia Karamali, Antony Joury, Emma Whitehead, , Jo Cook, Caitlin Hudson, Dan Dodds and Chris Ingram.

Engineers: Ramboll Computational Design (RCD) –  Stephen Melville, Harri Lewis, James Solly

Suppliers: Hess Precision (Plywood Laser Cutting), One-to-Metal, (Metal Punching and Folding), Safway (Scaffolding), West Coast Netting (Netting)

Special Thanks: BettieJune, Ben Stoelting, Kevin Meers, Caroline Holmes, Chloe Brubaker, Papa Bear,

Photos by Jo Cook, Arthur Mamou-Mani, Toby Burgess, Luka Kreze, Thanasis Korras, Antony Joury. 

Back view Just before burning Shipwreck
Back view Just before burning Shipwreck
Front view of the Fractal Cult timber pods and Scaffolding
Front view of the Fractal Cult timber pods and Scaffolding

Here are couple more pictures of the finished projects:

A view of the Shipwreck with the man and a fish Art Car
A view of the Shipwreck with the man and a fish Art Car
Enjoying the sun on the shipwreck - back view
Enjoying the sun on the shipwreck – back view
Three french burners on the hammock
Three french burners on the hammock
A burner relaxing on the Fractal Cult scaffolding
A burner relaxing on the Fractal Cult scaffolding
View of timber pods and festival in background
View of timber pods and festival inbackground
View of timber pods with shipwreck and man in background
View of timber pods with shipwreck and man in background
Interior of the Fractal Cult during Day time
Interior of the Fractal Cult during Day time
Fractal Cult at night time
Fractal Cult at night time

Some images of the construction of Shipwreck, from the collection of the pieces all the way to the assembly

The group in front of Shipwreck
The group in front of Shipwreck

Shipwreck building Burning Man 2013

Construction process, the shipwreck hammock cantilever being erected
Construction process, the shipwreck hammock cantilever being erected
A view of the construction before adding the hammock strips
A view of the construction before adding the hammock strips
Building the shipwreck - finishing the cave part.
Building the shipwreck – finishing the cave part.
All the Shipwreck parts unrolled on the desert floor before assembly
All the Shipwreck parts unrolled on the desert floor before assembly
The shipwreck flat packed in the 24ft truck.
The shipwreck flat packed in the 24ft truck.

Images of the construction process of Fractal Cult until the burn:

Burning Man 2013
Burning Fractal Cult in the Communal Burn
Toby, Luka and Tim assembling the scaffolding for Fractal cult
Toby, Luka and Tim assembling the scaffolding for Fractal cult
Fractal Cult's scaffolding assembly is based on this smaller physical model
Fractal Cult’s scaffolding assembly is based on this smaller physical model
The scaffolding being assembled in the middle of the pods
The scaffolding being assembled in the middle of the pods
Assembling the first pod
Assembling the first pod
The Fractal Cult pods being assembled.
The Fractal Cult pods being assembled.
Getting the ground anchors in for the pods
Getting the ground anchors in for the pods
Getting the scaffolding in the 24ft truck
Getting the scaffolding in the 24ft truck

Finally, how we made our camp look more like a home and less like a refugee camp:

Our camp as it looked at the end
Our camp as it looked at the end
Protecting ourselves from a dust storm!
Protecting ourselves from a dust storm!
Assembling the Hexayurts
Assembling the Hexayurts
The group in our kitchen
The group in our kitchen
One of our two food runs in Reno - Feeding 20 people in the desert.
One of our two food runs in Reno – Feeding 20 people in the desert.
Getting the camp from a lockup in Reno
Getting the camp from a lockup in Reno

A beautiful view of the festival itself at sunrise:

Burning Man Camps and Playa at Sunrise
Burning Man Camps and Playa at Sunrise

Here is a text that we wrote about the experience:

Diploma Studio 10:
Diploma Studio 10 at the University of Westminster is led by Toby Burgess and Arthur Mamou-Mani. They both believe that involvement is key to the process of learning and therefore always try to get their students to “get out and build” their designs in the real world. The studio starts the year with the study of systems, natural, mathematical and architectural systems of all sort, paired with intense software training in order to build up skills and a set of rules to design a small scale project which they will be able to build during a real event in the summer. Throughout the year, they build large scale prototypes and draw very accurate technical drawings, they also need to provide a budget and explain how it makes sense within the wider context of the festival, some of them will event start crowd-funding campaign to self-finance the projects. Our ultimate goal is to give them an awareness of entrepreneurship in Architecture and how to initiate projects as this is for us the best way to fight unemployment in our profession.
Burning Man and the 10 Principles:
The Burning Man festival takes place every summer in Black Rock desert, Nevada. It is a “participant-led” festival in which the activities are initiated by the people attending it. There are around 60,000 “burners” every year building a giant temporary city in which they create a social experiment which follows the 10 principles of Burning Man. They conclude the festival by burning a large sculpture of a Man.
What interested Toby and Arthur are the 10 principle which guide the “burners”: Radical Self-Reliance, Radical Inclusion, Gifting, Leaving No trace, to name a few. Designing with these rules in mind help students understand basic issues of sustainability. Designing for Burning Man also helps the students to design with “playfulness” in mind, as all the structures have to be climbable and interactive. We are not the only one inspired by these rules, Sergei Brin, co-founder of Google, asks all his staff to follow the principles when they come up with new ideas.
The Story:
On our first year at Westminster we found out that our student could submit their Burning Man proposals and receive a grant from the organizers. After receiving 20 submissions from the same school, the organizers were very intrigued and decided to contact us. The director of the Art Grant told us that she loved the project but that all of them were just not possible in the context. She decided to visit us in London to explain what we could do to submit better projects the following year which we did. On the second run, the festival chose two projects, Shipwreck by Georgia Rose Collard-Watson and Fractal Cult by Thanasis Korras.
These two projects are representative of the way we run our studio: Thanasis looked at Fractal on Brief01 and Georgia looked at ways to bend and assemble strips of wood together. They both explored these systems before submitting a project with a very strong narrative which fitted perfectly the burning man philosophy. Thanasis linked his Fractal to the symbol of “Merkaba” whereas Georgia told the story of a shipwreck which offered shelter from the dust storms.
Once the project got chosen, we partnered with an engineer, Ramboll and started researching for suppliers and fabrication facilities in the USA. We took the 3D files from concept all the way parametric models for fabrication. We started a Gantt chart with every step to take from rental of 24ft truck, collection of item all the way to demolition.
One of the main aspect that required a lot of planning was the camp. We had to plan every meal and food that would not perish under the extreme condition. We also found a way to rent a whole camp equipment from past burners.
On site:
The team grew little by little, many of our student could not afford the trip or could not take such a long time off so we asked around if anyone else would like to join us and thanks to our blog posts and active social networking online, students from the Architectural Association, Columbia or UCL started showing interest and joined the team.
Our first surprise on site was the power of the dust storm. One of our Yurt flew away and some of us got stuck in different places of the site seeking shelter. We were terrorised. Sleeping in tents was also extremely hard as you would be awaken by temperatures approaching 40degrees celcius, at the end of the construction, a lot of us would sleep in the foam hexayurts in which we were storing equipment at first.
We learned so much.

Shipwreck and Fractal Cult Updates 4

Thank you so much everyone – We received funding on Kickstarter You can still help us by donating on our Paypal button:

donate-with-paypal2

The past couple weeks since our last updates were very busy. We have sent all the fabrication files to our contact next to San Francisco. To make sure the files were alright we had several meetings with our engineers and made a lot of physical tests.

The team has shrunk so if you are keen to join us from the 18th August until the 6th September,you can email us at info@WeWantToLearn.net

A special thanks to Harri Lewis, Stephen Melville and James Solly from Ramboll Computational Design (RCD) for their precious help all along!

Here are couple updates on the projects:

SHIPWRECK

Shipwreck final files sent to fabrication - Updated Render - Note: The sail and light might change
Shipwreck final files sent to fabrication – Updated Render 1 – Note: The sail and light might change – File by Georgia Collard-Watson, Arthur Mamou-Mani , Chris Ingram and Toby Burgess
Shipwreck final files sent to fabrication - Updated Render - Note: The sail and light might change
Shipwreck final files sent to fabrication – Updated Render 2 – Note: The sail and light might change – File by Georgia Collard-Watson, Arthur Mamou-Mani , Chris Ingram and Toby Burgess
Shipwreck final files sent to fabrication - Updated Render - Note: The sail and light might change
Shipwreck final files sent to fabrication – Updated Render 3 – Note: The sail and light might change – File by Georgia Collard-Watson, Arthur Mamou-Mani , Chris Ingram and Toby Burgess
Shipwreck - Fabrication Files
Shipwreck – Fabrication Files – File by Georgia Collard-Watson, Arthur Mamou-Mani , Chris Ingram and Toby Burgess
6mm wood bending tests
6mm wood bending tests – Does it bend enough? Study by Georgia Collard-Watson
Maximum Radius on wood structure
Maximum Radius on wood structure – Study by Georgia Collard-Watson
Ramboll Structural Analysis - showing new location for  ropes
Ramboll Structural Analysis by Harri Lewis – showing new location for ropes
Ramboll Structural Analysis - showing new location for  ropes
Ramboll Structural Analysis by Harri Lewis – showing new location for ropes

FRACTAL CULT

Extract from the Fractal Cult Assembly Sequence by Dan Dodds after feedback from Harri Lewis
Extract from the Fractal Cult Assembly Sequence by Dan Dodds after feedback from Harri Lewis

Click Here to see the full Assembly Sequence Diagrams

Extract from the Fractal Cult Fabrication Files from Dan Dodds
Extract from the Fractal Cult Fabrication Files from Dan Dodds
Cost Savings - New dimensions of the Fractal Cult
Cost Savings – New dimensions of the Fractal Cult – Study by Thanasis Korras and Toby Burgess
Fractal Cult's new scale and new netting strategy
Fractal Cult’s new scale and new netting strategy – Study by Thanasis Korras and Toby Burgess
Fractal Cult's new scale and new netting strategy
Fractal Cult’s new scale and new netting strategy – – Study by Thanasis Korras and Toby Burgess
Fractal Cult scaffolding test model
Fractal Cult scaffolding test model – Study by Thanasis Korras and Toby Burgess
Fractal Cult scaffolding test model
Fractal Cult scaffolding test model – Study by Thanasis Korras and Toby Burgess
Toby presenting the Scaffolding Structure at Ramboll
Toby presenting the Scaffolding Structure at Ramboll – Picture taken by Harri Lewis

Updates on our Burning Man projects

– Help us finance the projects on Kickstarter

After a long day of work with Chris Ingram, Dan Dodds and Thanasis Korras yesterday, we have nearly finished 3D modelling the two projects. The Fractal Cult was redrawn using rules defined by the hinge connection suggested by Ramboll. There are 5 different types of piece that make up each of the four fractal cults. Extracts from the rules as specified by Dan Dodds and Thanasis Korras:

  • The Acute angles on all triangles all have bolt holes with an offset of 32mm
  • The Obstuse angles all have bolt holes with an offset of 22mm

For each Fractal Cult pods:

  • 12x   Large AAO [Acute,Actute,Obtuse]       : Side length 1241mm
  • 18x   Medium AOO [Acute,Obtuse,Obtuse] : Side length 608mm
  • 9x     Medium AAO [Acute,Actute,Obtuse]   : Side length 591mm
  • 54x   Small AOO [Acute,Obtuse,Obtuse]      : Side length 283mm
  • 108x Small AAO [Acute,Actute,Obtuse]        : Side length 266mm

See iimages below:

View of the 3D model of Fractal Cult
View of the 3D model of Fractal Cult
Offset Ply Model on Grasshopper by Dan Dodds
Offset Ply Model on Grasshopper by Dan Dodds
CNC Layout for Quote - Fractal Cult - Dan Dodds
CNC Layout for Quote – Fractal Cult – Dan Dodds
Hinge specification defining the rules for the parametric model
Hinge specification defining the rules for the parametric model
The Module being repeated for the 3d model with hinges
The Module being repeated for the 3d model with hinges by Thanasis Korras
View of the hinges in the module
View of the hinges in the module by Thanasis Korras
Hinged model of triangle by Thanasis Korras
Hinged model of triangle by Thanasis Korras
Hinged model of triangle by Thanasis Korras
Hinged model of triangle by Thanasis Korras

The Shipwreck now has more support on the ground which will help with the cantilever. The supports being more pronounced, we used this as an opportunity to create a bench. We are planning to finish the fabrication files this afternoon. We are still missing some notches, thickness as well as labelling and unrolling all the pieces.

Shipwreck ribs and spines
Shipwreck ribs and spines
Shipwreck ribs and spines
Shipwreck ribs and spines
Shipwreck ribs and spines
Shipwreck ribs and spines
Shipwreck ribs and spines
Shipwreck ribs and spines
Shipwreck - Work in Progress - Aerial View - Showing the new bench
Shipwreck – Work in Progress – Aerial View – Showing the new bench
Shipwreck - Work in Progress - Side View
Shipwreck – Work in Progress – Side View
Shipwreck - Work in Progress - Front View
Shipwreck – Work in Progress – Front View
Shipwreck - Work in Progress - Back View
Shipwreck – Work in Progress – Back View
Shipwreck - Work in Progress - Back View
Shipwreck – Work in Progress – Back View

8th November 2012 Tutorial

Great Thursday tutorials at Westminster! Thank you to former DS10 students George HintzenJoe Magri and Chris Mount for their presentation on their trip to the Burning Man festival last summer. We have just started Brief02: Template. Students will start designing a temporary structure for the Burning Man festival or an Open-Source Construction Set.

Above: Jessica Beagelman’s beautiful laser-cut plywood experiments

Above: William Garforth-Bless scanned his ferofluid and will turn them into inhabitable fountains

Above: Sarah Shuttleworth’s beautiful swarm generated wood structures

Above: George Hintzen, Joe Magri and Chris Mount presenting their Burning Man experience

TETRA

TETRA is an installation that exploits the potential of mass participation to create a form that emerges from the interactions of hundreds of people with the construction system over a number of days.

Inspired by the work of R. Buckminster Fuller into space-packing polyhedra, it explores the unique three dimensional geometrical properties of the regular tetrahedron and related ‘tetrahelices’ [also known Boerdijk–Coxeter Helices]. Their geometries provide an invisible framework for the participants to work within. The modular tetrahedral construction system will be used by the participants to create forms that automatically diverge from one another.

These in turn provide spaces separated from other participants for individuals to pause and reflect on the location and nature of their surroundings. TETRA’s position out on the edge of Black Rock City means that once the structure starts to take shape, participants will be able to climb to positions that afford views across the city. Just as Burning Man asks participants to take a step back from the consumer capitalism, so TETRA allows participants to step back and view Black Rock City as a whole

TETRA is a modular kit of parts that are assembled by participants into a structure that changes form over the course of the festival. There are 160 modules, each one a tetrahedron made from four equilateral triangle shaped pieces of CNC cut exterior plywood. Each triangular face has a hole cut from its centre which, as well as decreasing the overall weight of the module, allows the modules to become rungs in a structure that can be climbed up, on, in and through.

The ply edges of the four plywood triangles are bound together with rope to ensure a joint that can transmit loads in tension from one sheet of ply to the adjacent two. There are pre-drilled re-enforced holes near each vertex to allow for adjacent modules to be bolted together with bolts and wing-nuts by participants.

Each module is designed for one person to carry while climbing sections of the structure already built. The participants are able to climb any of the structure that is already built, and bolt their new module onto the existing structure. Once built, participants are able to climb up, select a module to remove and move to another place. This means that the overall form is not set by the designer, but emerges from the collective desires of a large group of participants.

Because of the intrinsic geometry of tetrahedra and tetrahelices, the form will always contain diverging branches with inhabitable spaces within them.