WikiWax

This project looked to understand and develop a construction set that could be open source such as the WikiHouse CNC construction set. Through the material research done, I have predominately focused on the use of wax in construction. Experiments have explored its use as a form-finder, form-work and as a composite material. To apply this system as a Wiki, I strived to develop potential products, along with build information, which could then be open source. However the nature of the research, the complexity of the processes, and the functionality of the final products led me to question whether the Wiki route would be feasible. As an alternative, I have begun to explore taking the system along a business route, whilst considering making parts open source for individuals.

Weighing up the options:

1. Open Source
If someone wants to make an item then they have the information available to do so. This could be particularly relevant for the environmental products which could act as cheap DIY alternatives for those that can afford to buy specialist systems.

2. Private copyrighted business
The nature of the WikiWax processes makes it difficult to replicate, they are also not items of necessity nor would they be built as a collective. These are just some of the reasons why the systems developed don’t naturally lend themselves to be open source. As beautiful items they could instead be made into unique designer products and sold.

3. Open Source but protected form big companies
This approach allows for both systems to operate. Individuals can make their own table for example or develop and modify the processes, allowing for innovation and growth. But also products can be patented and sold. Through this strategy architecture is open to 100% of the population rather than the 1% if limited to sale only.

WAXFORM

WAXFORM2

WAXFORM3

WAXFORM4

WAXFORM5

WAXFORM6

For further information on my research and material experiments see my portfolio

29th November 2012 Cross-Crit

Some pictures of our last Cross-Crit. Thank you very much to our crit David Andreen, Jack Munro, Dusan Decermic and Anthony Boulanger.

Emma Whitehead's convection cell sectional models.Above: Emma Whitehead’s convection cells sectional models

Michael Clarke's parametric Abeille VaultAbove: Michael Clarke’s Parametric Abeille’s Vault

Luka Kreze's tensegrity experiements

Luka Kreze’s tensegrity tower experiments

Marilu Valente's Starch form finding experiments

Marilu Valente’s potato starch form finding experiements

Wax Structures

These images show the results of some recent experiments using wax and water.
To achieve the structures I filled a container with hot melted wax, weighted it so it would sink, then dropped it into a larger container full of cold tap water (approx 10 degrees)
Due to the lower density of the wax it rises to the surface of the water, and in doing so exposes an increasing surface area to the water allowing it to cool and solidify on its way up.
This technique has resulted in some exciting organic flowing structures which I hope to analyse further and develop more architecturally.