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I have been researching Miura pattern origami as a structural solution for rapidly deployable structures. Miura ori are interesting as structures due to their ability to develop from a flat surface to a 3D form, and become fully rigid, with no degrees of freedom, once constrained at certain points. 141110_Year 2 working folio2 Physical and digital experiments with Miura Ori have taught me that certain topographies can be generated by developing a modified Miura pattern. With the help of Tomohiro Tachi’s excellent research on the subject of curved Miura ori, including his Freeform Origami simulator (http://www.tsg.ne.jp/TT/index.html) I have learned that Miura ori surfaces that curve in the X and Y axes can be generated by modifying the tessellating components, however these modifications require some flexibility in the material, or looseness of the hinges. 141110_Year 2 working folio6 As a system for a rapidly deployable structure, I am most interested in the potential for the modified Miura ori to work as a structure built with cheap, readily available sheet materials which are generally planar, so I will continue to develop this system as a rigid panel system with loose hinges that can be tightened after the structure is deployed. 141110_Year 2 working folio4 In order to test the crease pattern’s ability to form a curved surface, I have defined a component within the Miura pattern that can tessellate with itself. The radius of this component’s developed surface is measured as it is gradually altered.

With the objective being to develop a system for the construction of a rapidly deployable structure, I have also been interested in understanding the Miura ori’s characteristics as it is developed from flat. Physical and digital tests were performed to determine the system’s willingness to take on a curve as its crease angles decrease from flat sheet to fully developed. I found the tightest radius was achieved rapidly as the sheet was folded, with the radius angle reaching a plateau. This is interesting from the perspective of one with the desire to create a structure that has a predictable surface topography, as well as from a material optimisation standpoint; the target topography can be achieved without the wasteful deep creases of an almost fully developed Miura ori. 141110_Year 2 working folio5 With the learnings of the modified Miura ori tests in mind, a simple loose hinged cylinder is simulated. As the pattern returns on itself and is fastened, the degrees of freedom are removed and the structure is fully rigid. 141110_Year 2 working folio A physical model of the system was constructed with rigidly planar MDF panels and fabric hinges. The hinges were flexible enough to allow the hinge movement necessary in developing this particular modified Miura ori, however some of the panels’ corners peeled away from the fabric backing as the system was developed from flat. A subsequent test will seek to refine this hinge detail, with a view to creating a scalable construction detail that will allow sufficient flexibility during folding, as well as strength once in final position. 141110_Year 2 working folio3

John Konings

j.e.konings@gmail.com

As a continuation in the development of the Crest Pouring technique, diverting components are introduced in order to gain control over the flow paths of the material. These videos show a series of initial experiments in RealFlow, which help to understand how different components placed in different configurations have a specific effect on the material flow. These experiments will now be backed up by more specific investigations and physical experiments.

Project Vasari supports performance-based design via integrated energy modeling and analysis features. Project Vasari can be used in conjunction with Ecotect Wind Rose analysis to dynamically simulate the impact of wind speed and direction on a projects. This prototype plug-in provides a simplified “virtual wind tunnel” that allows designers and engineers to run computational fluid dynamic early in the design process.
For more information on this software on http://labs.autodesk.com/utilities/vasari/

As part of an investigation into gridshells I posted in the Grasshopper forum to try and find a solution to a definition using the bend force component through the Kangaroo plug-in for Grasshopper.

My intention was to deform a grid into lathes using a bend force whilst maintaining the overall length of each lathe (or curve) as a representation of how gridshell are constructed on site, where they are raised or lowered into position from an originally flat grid, and deform or bend due to their own self weight.

Daniel Piker the creator of Kangaroo replied with a very useful script component that allows the user to easily find the correct inputs for a divided curve that is plugged into the bend component.

He also very kindly finished the definition for me.

The files including the C# script component can be found in the forum post here if you would also like to investigate the bend force.

http://www.grasshopper3d.com/forum/topics/kangaroo-bending-1 

Above: Video Capture showing the curves bending in Rhino with Kangaroo

Below is a tutorial by Mario Vergara on how to install and use Winair (this link also contains a tutorial). WinAir is a plugin to perform CFD analysis (wind flow) on a mesh using Ecotect. The video tutorial is in Spanish but very easy to follow even without sound. There are couple questions already online on the Autodesk forum about Win Air. and some work on the GH forum related to it.

[vimeo http://www.vimeo.com/30227121]

 

Above: The Winair Interface on ecotect 

Above: The kind of results extracted from Winair 

 Work by Alessio Erioli using WinAir

LMN Architect has just published a review of the DIVA plugin for Grasshopper. 

DIVA uses Radiance, a free environemtal simulation software which you can download and install to run alongside Ecotect.

Radiance is more precise than Ecotect and can be used for Daylight studies, producing extremely accurate renders.

DIVA was written by Jeff Niemasz, a Harvard GSD student, as part of his masters project on re-visiting the aqua tower by Studio Gang.

You can register to the DIVA for Grasshopper group on the forum and follow the tutorial on installation (See videos below).

[vimeo http://vimeo.com/29811576]

 

 Above: Portfolio page from Green Re Articulates Red, my diploma project at the AA

 

 Above: Simulation Matrix from LMNTS using DIVA for Grasshopper