System Development: Spidron

First developed in 1979 by Dániel Erdély the Spidron is created by recursively dividing a 2-dimensional hexagon into triangles, forming a pattern that consists of one equilateral followed by one isosceles triangle. The resulting form is of six Spidron legs that, when folded along their edges, deform to create a 3-dimensional Spidron.

Spidron Nest

Spidron System_Parametrics_Lorna Jackson

Initial investigations into the Spidron system using paper resulted in irregular shapes that could not be predicted, and therefore replicated precisely. Progressing onto using rigid materials allowed the system to be broken down into six components, removing unnecessary triangulated fold lines, and developing latch folded Spidron that is precisely the same as that formed parametrically.

Spidron System_Three SPidrons_Lorna Jackson

This relationship between parametric and physical tests of component based Spidrons in both regular and irregular hexagons, as well as various other equal-sided shapes, has enabled the development of large scale models concluding thus far in a 1:2 scale version being built which will continue to be developed as a pavilion for submission to the Burning Man festival.

In parallel there has been an investigation into the system at a smaller scale allowing for the Spidron nest to be made as one component. In order to achieve the 3-dimensional Spidron form lattice hinges, also known as kerf folds, have been employed. Rigorous testing into the best cutting pattern have resulted in a straight line cutting pattern that allows for bending on multiple axis at once.

Developing this smaller scale system for submission to Buro Happold the intention is to create an arrayed system that is a conglomeration of both regular and irregular spidrons with varying depths and apertures that are able to integrate various display models etc. within.

Science-Fiction Timeline

DS10 started the year researching sci-fi novels, movies, magazines and technological discoveries from the past two centuries. Here are the timelines showing the historical and political events,as well as the technological discoveries that greatly influenced Science Fiction from the 1800s until today.

1800-1825
1800-1825
1825-1850
1850-1875
1875-1900
1900-1905
1905-1910
1910-1915
1915-1920
1920-1925
1925-1930
1930-1935
1935-1940
1940-1944 (1)
1940-1945
1945-1950
1950-1955
1955-1960
1960-1965
1965-1970
1970-1975
1975-1980
1980-1985
1985-1990
1990-1995
1995-2000
1995-2000
2000-2005
2000-2005
2005-2010
2005-2010
2010-2014
2010-2015

29th November 2012 Cross-Crit

Some pictures of our last Cross-Crit. Thank you very much to our crit David Andreen, Jack Munro, Dusan Decermic and Anthony Boulanger.

Emma Whitehead's convection cell sectional models.Above: Emma Whitehead’s convection cells sectional models

Michael Clarke's parametric Abeille VaultAbove: Michael Clarke’s Parametric Abeille’s Vault

Luka Kreze's tensegrity experiements

Luka Kreze’s tensegrity tower experiments

Marilu Valente's Starch form finding experiments

Marilu Valente’s potato starch form finding experiements

22nd October Cross-crit

Below are couple pictures of our first cross-crit yesterday. We would like to thank the critiques, Kester Rattenbury, Lawrence Lek, Andrei Martin, Daniel Piker, Jack Munro and Adam Holloway for their helpful comments. Great work, keep it up guys!

Above: Marilu Valente showing her potato starch elastic columns

Above: Andrei Jipa’s crystal formation and soap interference.

Above: Thanasis Korras’ plywood fractal.

18th October tutorials

More great work from our students exploring the digitization and physical fabrication of structural, mathematical and natural systems…

Above: George Guest’s wasp nest wood pulp model

Augmented Reality Experiments


While trying to figure out useful ways to interact with some wire frame models of 3D Harmonographs, I started exploring some examples of augmented reality software that allows a 3D mesh model to be tracked to a physical marker. The two pieces of software experimented with were the AR Plugin for Autodesk Showcase and LinceoRV. Both are stand-alone render/presentation engines with an augmented reality mode.

I found the Showcase AR Plugin to work well with pre-recorded footage, but not accept my live webcam feed, and LinceoRV to work much better with the live feed, but be more limited on the types of marker that it accepted. Both pieces of software can handle multiple markers.

The software basically analyses a binary [black and white] feed from the film, recognises the marker symbols, and works out their distortion due to perspective. It then uses this distortion to accurately recreate the camera position in relation to the digital model.

Using the LinceoRV software could be an useful way to present/manipulate 3D models that are too challenging/costly to print.

3rd May Tutorials

Some pictures of our latest DS10 tutorial session. Less than 10 days before the final jury.

Above: Amazing IKEA-like construction manual for Marina Karamali‘s time bank headquarters in Athens, Greece.

Above: A building made of sand, wind and cow-blood by Jack Munro

Above: a growing and spiralling Tech-Hub in London from Chris Ingram