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Here we are – we have reached the middle of the academic year at the University of Westminster. Time to assess and appreciate our students portfolios and hard work during a lively “interim cross-marking” with our colleagues. Here are couple examples of the most remarkable portfolios in our Diploma Studio 10. Very excited to start our new brief03 on future …

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Some joyous proposals for both Burning Man and Buro Happold’s London office at yesterdays crit, the first of the year.

Our guest critics were Andrew Best, James Solly, Andrei Jipa, Harry Charringdon and Ben Stringer. Thank you all for your inspiring comments and tireless enthusiasm throughout the day.

Here are some images of the exciting work coming out of the studio this year, more to come 🙂

Frozen music pavilion by Toby Plunkett inspired by the soundwaves inside a cube

Frozen music pavilion by Toby Plunkett inspired by the soundwaves inside a cube

Diana

Diana Raican’s transforming cubes model

 

Diana Raican

Burning Man proposal by Diana Raican exploring fractal cubes

 

Garis Iu

Bent timber pavilion by Garis Iu

Naomi Danos Andrei Jipa

Guest critic and DS10 alumni Andrei Jipa with Naomi Danos’s hypar surfaces model

 

Inspired by Cairo tesselation, playful pavillion by Sarah Stell

Sarah Stell’s model capturing the translation of cubes into dodecahedrons

Lianne Clark’s animated keyframe light and shadow explorations

Jon Leung’s bismuth inspired pavilion

Aslan Adnan’s perturbated pavilion inspired by crystal growth patterns

The Tower of Power by Tobias Power

Rheotomic surface installation by Tobias Power

Charlotte Yates animated jitterbug model proposed for Buro Happold

lorna

Lorna Jackson’s spidron installations at different scales

joe

Joe Leach’s pavilion of timber tension

ttt

Tom Jelley’s anamorphosis experiments remapping geometry

Tom

Tom jelley’s magical anamorphic proposal

We are approaching the first “crit” of the term and our students are already proposing joyful projects for the Burning Man festival and Buro Happold’s newly refurbished HQ on Newman Street. The talented photographer NK Guy (http://nkguy.com/ and http://burningcam.com/) gave an excellent evening lecture at our campus to inspire our students and for the release of the book “The Art of Burning Man” (Taschen) which will feature some of our studio’s work. Here are couple images of the student’s project and of our buzzing DS10 space (pictures by Toby Burgess):

Aslan Adnan's early proposals for Buro Happold and Burning Man

Aslan Adnan’s early proposals for Buro Happold and Burning Man

Aslan Adnan's Explosive Recursion

Aslan Adnan’s Explosive Recursion

Joe Leach's early proposal for Burning Man

Joe Leach’s early proposal for Burning Man

Tom Jelley's Mirror deformation of 3d geometry using the inversion principle.

Tom Jelley’s Mirror deformation of 3d geometry using the inversion principle.

Lorna Jackson's kerfed Spirohedron. (spidron ™ )

Lorna Jackson’s kerfed Spirohedron. (spidron ™ )

Garis Iu's Curved Folding Components

Garis Iu’s Curved Folding Components

Toby Plunket's 3D Cymatic

Toby Plunket’s 3D Cymatic

Lorna Jackson's kerfed Spirohedron. (spidron ™ )

Lorna Jackson’s kerfed Spirohedron. (spidron ™ )

DS10 WeWanttoLearn's  buzzing Studio Space

DS10 WeWanttoLearn’s buzzing Studio Space

Ieva Ciocyte's Tree Bundling Truss

Ieva Ciocyte’s Tree Bundling Truss

Naomi Danos Folded Hypar volumes

Naomi Danos Folded Hypar volumes

NK Guy, author of The Art of Burning Man giving a lecture to our students

NK Guy, author of The Art of Burning Man giving a lecture to our students

NK Guy, author of The Art of Burning Man giving a lecture to our students

NK Guy, author of The Art of Burning Man giving a lecture to our students

We just finished Brief01:System/Sci-Fi and starting Brief02:Buro/Burn – Here are couple pictures of our last tutorials by Toby Burgess. Students will be uploading their systems on Monday on this blog!

Our Joyful DS10 Studio - Picture by Vlad Ignatescu

Our Joyful DS10 Studio – Picture by Vlad Ignatescu

Spirohedron by Lorna jackson

Spirohedron by Lorna jackson

Spirohedron by Lorna jackson

Spirohedron by Lorna jackson

Spirohedron by Lorna jackson

Spirohedron by Lorna jackson

Spirohedron by Lorna jackson

Spirohedron by Lorna jackson

Pyritohedrons by Sarah Stell

Pyritohedrons by Sarah Stell

Pyritohedrons by Sarah Stell

Pyritohedrons by Sarah Stell

Recursive Explosion by Aslan Adnan

Curved Kerf Folding by Garius Iu

Curved Kerf Folding by Garis Iu

Inversion Principle by Tom Jelley

Inversion Principle by Tom Jelley

Tom Jelley's Inversion Principle explained in a model

Tom Jelley’s Inversion Principle explained in a model

Miura-Ori studies by John KoningsJohn Konings rigid Miura Ori Origami

Recursive Reciprocal Structure by Irina Ghiuzan

Recursive Reciprocal Structure by Irina Ghiuzan

Tobias Power plotting complex numbers onb a vertical axis - Rheotomic Surface inspired by Daniel Piiker

Tobias Power plotting complex numbers onb a vertical axis – Rheotomic Surface inspired by Daniel Piiker

Jonathan Leung creating his own Bismuth Crystals

Jonathan Leung creating his own Bismuth Crystals

Esha Hashim's Fabric Tensegrity

Esha Hashim’s Fabric Tensegrity

Lianne Clarke's Reaction Diffusion Patterns on Acrylic

Lianne Clarke’s Reaction Diffusion Patterns on Acrylic

DS10 started the year researching sci-fi novels, movies, magazines and technological discoveries from the past two centuries. Here are the timelines showing the historical and political events,as well as the technological discoveries that greatly influenced Science Fiction from the 1800s until today.

1800-1825

1800-1825

1825-1850

1850-1875

1875-1900

1900-1905

1905-1910

1910-1915

1915-1920

1920-1925

1925-1930

1930-1935

1935-1940

1940-1944 (1)

1940-1945

1945-1950

1950-1955

1955-1960

1960-1965

1965-1970

1970-1975

1975-1980

1980-1985

1985-1990

1990-1995

1995-2000

1995-2000

2000-2005

2000-2005

2005-2010

2005-2010

2010-2014

2010-2015

This is the very firs experiment I did in DS10, October 2012. Even if I was unable to find an architectural application, i still find the interference colour patterns to be beautiful images, so I’m posting them here, hoping they will inspire someone else.

Thin-film interference occurs when incident light waves reflected by the upper and lower boundaries of a thin film interfere with one another to form a new wave. Check out the wikepedia article: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thin-film_interference

Thin Film Interference Pattern

Thin Film Interference Pattern

Thin Film Interference Pattern

Thin Film Interference Pattern

Thin Film Interference Pattern

Thin Film Interference Pattern

Thin Film Interference Pattern

Thin Film Interference Pattern

Thin Film Interference Pattern

Thin Film Interference Pattern

Thin Film Interference Pattern

Thin Film Interference Pattern

The beginning of the 20th century, and more specifically, the interwar, witnessed many changes, especially technology wise, which, along with the economical climate of the time and the emerging social ideas, favored new political regimes and carved the way for visionaries to imagine new cities and new worlds.

The spirit of the machine age was becoming dominant, industry was beginning to shape the economy and advancements in the car industry (new engines and new tires were being developed at that time) started changing the way people lived.

At the same time the radio was taking shape, with the first broadcasting station being established in the US in 1920 and quickly spreading. In 1928 the radio beacon was invented, and by 1930 the radio was mainstream, providing people with cheap entertainment (the US were going to the Great Depression, radio was cheap and fun) and political powers with a great tool for propaganda. The TV was also invented in this period, with the electrical TV being discovered in 1927.

Politically, dictatorship was beginning to take shape.

Mussolini came to power in 1922, promoting a cult for personality and laying down the principles of the doctrine of fascism. Propaganda was one of his main tools, and the radio was a very good medium for doing this. He presented his ideas of idealism by imposing ideas of collective and hierarchy.

Shortly after, Germany was become Nazi Germany, with Hitler rising to power. Again, this was a regime were the power was centralized in the hands of the dictator, who, through propaganda, burning of books and controlling the radio, was controlling public opinion and the arts society. Needles to say, Hitler`s ideal society was one based on race, and homogeneity.

Russia was also seeing changes. Stalin rose to power and set the goal for a communist society. He promoted authoritarianism, a centralized state and collectivization. He saw the opportunity of the machine age and carved an industry based economy, reshaping the way Russian society was organized, both at a social level, and at a physical one, by promoting urbanization (villages were turned into cities).

Within this context, visionaries began responding.

First moving image produce by Baird`s "televisor", 1926

First moving image produce by Baird`s “televisor”, 1926

Baird`s televisor equipment

Baird`s televisor equipment

jazz singer

Snippet from “The Jazz Singer”, the first talking movie by Warner Bros

We

Yevgeny Zamyatin

We is a Russian dystopian novel first published in 1924 in New York.

Set in the future, the novel depicts an urbanized setting constructed entirely by glass, which allows the secret political police to supervise the public with ease. Life is organized in such a way as to promote maximum production in a system were the power is centralized in the hands of one person, The Benefactor. Principles of egalitarianism are promoted, the people not having names but numbers, and all wearing identical clothing. The only form of entertainment for the society is the marching in forms, while listening to the State Anthem.

However, the novel is a criticism of an organized dystopia, tackling the theme of the rebellion of the human primitive spirit against a rationalized, machined world. This is apparent from the plot, which is centered around the love story between the two main characters, who play with the idea of a revolution.

In his satire, Zamytian had in mind the Soviet Union, which at that time was a single party dictatorship. Future conditions depicted in the novel might also have been informed by Mussolini`s incipient fascist order. Even thought at that time life in the U.S.S.R. wasn`t exactly as depicted in the novel, Zamytian tackled the inevitable outcome of modern totalitarianism.

A center piece in sci fi literature, We has influenced future works, such as George Orwell`s 1984, which depicts a very similar scenario.

we

Zamytian`s imaginary world

Brave New World

Aldous Huxley

Brave New World is a novel published in 1932 and a milestone in modern Sci Fi. The novel anticipates changes in society through developments in reproductive technology, psychological manipulation, classical conditioning and sleep-learning.

Similar to We, the society depicted in this novel is a manipulated one, but, in this instance, it is so by the use of chemically controlled substances and hypnotic persuasion, rather than brute force.

Huxley used his novels as a means to express widely held opinions of that time., probably the most notable one being the fear of the loss of identity in a fast paced world. He feared that no one would want to read a book and that society would be given so much information that it would be reduced to passivity and egotism.

A trip which Huxley made to New York gave the novel much of its essence. Huxley was outraged by the youth culture, by the sexual promiscuity and by the commercial cheeriness he had witnessed. In his novel, he talks about “feelies”, which seem to be a response to “talkie” motion pictures (talking television was invented by Warner Bros at that time) and the sex-hormone chewing gum, which draws parallels to the ubiquitous chewing gum, which was a symbol of American youth at that time.

Brave New World

Brave New World

Radiant City

Le Corbusier

In response to the same political and technological context, Corbusier proposed his plans for Ville Radieuse, or the Radiant City.

The Radiant City was Corbusier`s ideal for a utopia which would respond to the world`s rapid development of that time.

Centered around rapid urbanization (specifically present in Russia at that time), advancements in transportation and industry, Corbusier`s ideas depicted high rise housing blocks, free circulation and abundant green spaces. Corbusier also believed that only a dictatorial government would be equipped to inaugurate the “age of harmony”, following the opposing values of benevolent imperialism and community control from European and English perspectives respectively.

Model of Ville Radieuse

Model of Ville Radieuse

Aerial View

Aerial View

radiant city 5

Broadacre City

Frank Lloyd Wright

Broadacre City is a concept for suburban living presented By Frank Lloyd Wright in his 1932 book The Dissapearing City. Is stood as a planning statement, as well as a socio-political scheme by which each American family would be allocated an Acre of land and a new community would be built based on this. Wright depicts a community were all transport would be done by automobile and the pedestrian can exist safely only within the allocated one acre. This proposal was again a decentralized one, with the homestead considered the conceptual center.

Plan of Broadacre City

Plan of Broadacre City

3.7m x 3.7m model of one part of Broadacre City, exhibited by Frank Lloyd Wright

3.7m x 3.7m model of one part of Broadacre City, exhibited by Frank Lloyd Wright

Aerial View

Aerial View

Car sketches for Broadacre City, by Frank Lloyd Wright

Car sketches for Broadacre City, by Frank Lloyd Wright