WeWantToLearn.net (Diploma Studio 10 at the University of Westminster led by Toby Burgess and Arthur Mamou-Mani)  is happy to announce more good news – Three of our students have just received art grants from the Burning Man Festival to build the pavilions they designed as part of our brief – Congratulations to the following winners:

All DS10 students will be offered a chance to build the projects this summer with the designers and we will be supported by RAMBOLL and Format Engineers.

Over the course of four years, DS10 has submitted a little more than 80 proposals to the Global Arts Grant of Burning Man and received a total of 6 grants including the ones for Fractal Cult Shipwreck (built in 2013) and Hayam (built in 2014). We are all very proud and excited to go back!

The Infinity Tree by Tobias Power

The Infinity Tree by Tobias Power

Reflection by Lorna Jackson

Reflection by Lorna Jackson

Bismuth Bivouac by Jon Leung

Bismuth Bivouac by Jon Leung

Watch our TEDx talk, The Architecture of Joy to understand the philosophy behind these projects
As the grant is limited, we need your help to pay for transportation and the additional costs related to construction, you can donate on the PayPal button below just indicate which project you want to donate to, kickstarter campaigns should follow shortly:

 

As part of international woman’s day I’m exploring differences between males and females in relation to the built environment in order to inform my final project. It only takes two minutes to complete and will directly influence the design progression.

https://sites.google.com/site/genderpreference/

Some examples of questions found in the survey can be found below:

tetrachromacy

material preferencetimber shapes proximity

Many Thanks

Image : Jan Gehl, How to Study Public Life, http://www.blogadilla.com/2008/06/08/are-you-a-tetrachromat/

BuroHappold_Engineering_logo

At the end of a marathon day during which 23 students presented project work to BuroHappold Engineering’s top executives, four students from Diploma Studio 10 (DS10) at the University of Westminster were selected to build temporary installations for the global engineering practice’s soon to be refurbished London offices. The presentations were overseen by their tutors Arthur Mamou-Mani and Toby Burgess, and Neil Billet, Andrew Best, Emma Greenough and James Solly from BuroHappold.

The winners of the competition were:

  • Garis Iu (71 Newman Street window) with The Meander, an 12 meters long flowing  cluster of laser-cut curved origami filtering views on street level towards the reception area.
  • Diana Raican (17 Newman Street window) with The Colliding Cubes,  a dramatic 5 meters wide wall suspended above the street and assembled with friction-based component dissolving through one another, parametrically designed to filter light and views.
  • Joe Leach (17 Newman Street Staircase) with The Falling Leaves, an innovative laser-cut curved truss system assembled around a series of nodes holding a beautiful array of wooden leaves.
  • Charlotte Yates (17 Newman Street separating screen) with The Jitterbuga kinetic installation inspired by Buckminster Fuller and made from punch-pressed aluminium icosahedron opening and closing depending on space requirements.

The projects celebrate 40 years of innovative structural solutions from BuroHappold and the practice’s commitment to supporting education in the fields of architecture, engineering and digital fabrication and will have a lifespan of a year before the next DS10 intake follow the same process and vie for an exhibition space.

We would like to thank David Scott and Edward Lancaster from the University of Westminster’s Fabrication Laboratory for all their support.

Here are images of the winning designs. More news to come on the expected launch date.

The Meander by Garis Iu - DS10 Univeristy of Westminster for BuroHappold Engineering (led by Arthur Mamou-Mani and Toby Burgess)

The Meander by Garis Iu – DS10 Univeristy of Westminster for BuroHappold Engineering (led by Arthur Mamou-Mani and Toby Burgess)

The Colliding Cubes by Diana Raican - DS10 Univeristy of Westminster for BuroHappold Engineering (led by Arthur Mamou-Mani and Toby Burgess)

The Colliding Cubes by Diana Raican – DS10 Univeristy of Westminster for BuroHappold Engineering (led by Arthur Mamou-Mani and Toby Burgess)

Jitterbug by Charlotte Yates - DS10 Univeristy of Westminster for BuroHappold Engineering (led by Arthur Mamou-Mani and Toby Burgess)

Jitterbug by Charlotte Yates – DS10 Univeristy of Westminster for BuroHappold Engineering (led by Arthur Mamou-Mani and Toby Burgess)

Falling Leaves by Joe Leach - DS10 Univeristy of Westminster for BuroHappold Engineering (led by Arthur Mamou-Mani and Toby Burgess)

Falling Leaves by Joe Leach – DS10 Univeristy of Westminster for BuroHappold Engineering (led by Arthur Mamou-Mani and Toby Burgess)

The student work will join the permanent installation “Wooden Waves” designed by DS10 tutor Arthur Mamou-Mani. More information on this project may be found on http://mamou-mani.com/BuroHappold.

TheWoodenWaves by Mamou-Mani at 17 and 71 Newman Street.

TheWoodenWaves by Mamou-Mani at 17 and 71 Newman Street.

We will be presenting a talk entitled ‘The Rise of the Entrepreneur Maker’ discussing recent work we have been doing with our DS10 students as well as our wider work in practice and academia.

There will also be an exhibition of DS10 student work, showcasing this year’s proposals for Burning Man and the four installations that the students are currently installing in Buro Happold’s London headquarters.

See poster below for more information…

RIBAlectureseries

Video- Filmed & Edited by Joshua Potter, including footage from Toby Burgess, Lianne Clark, and Vlad Ignatescu.

As part of our research for Brief 03; ‘Future Cities’, DS10 travelled to the wonderful city of Copenhagen, Denmark. The video above was made to provide a glimpse into the incredible time the unit had whilst visiting the city and all of the amazing Architecture it had to offer during our visit. Below is a schedule and some pictures that provide further details of our trip which took place from the 29th January  until the 2nd February 2015. We would like to thank all involved for their generosity and time.

  • Monday 2nd: Snow day in the city. Several snow fights occurred as students strolled through the city, enjoying the sights of ‘Tivoli’, ‘Christiansborg Palace’, ‘Børsen’, the ‘Danish Jewish Museum’ by Daniel Libeskind, ‘Det Kongelige Bibliotek (The Royal Library)’ which includes ‘The Black Diamond’ by Danish architects Schmidt Hammer Lassen, ‘Dome of Visions’ by Kristoffer Tejlgaard, ‘Frederik’s Church’ – which boasts the largest dome in Scandinavia, and also ‘The Little Mermaid’ by Edvard Eriksen. 
Pictures – Aslan Adnan, Toby Burgess, Esha Hashim, Vlad Ignatescu, Arthur Mamou-Mani and Joshua Potter.

component assembly

Inspired by minimal surfaces, more specifically triply periodic minimal surfaces, Hypar Infinity is a component based pavilion constructed from plywood sheets. The first part of the research focused on triply periodic minimal surfaces, that are locally area-minimizing, have a zero mean curvature and repeat themselves in three directions. Many of these surfaces were discovered by Alan Schoen in the 1970s. The research into infinite minimal surfaces led to experiments with hyperbolic paraboloids or hypars. Hypars are saddle shaped doubly ruled surfaces but act as minimal surfaces. Hypars can be easily folded, attached together in variety of ways, and infinitely repeated. In my proposal I attached six hypars together creating a star-like shape that became the module, which is then mirrored along its edges to create the final design.

The pavilion aims to create a social environment and encourages self-exploration and social interaction among its visitors. The structure provides a place to relax, socialize, hide-away from the sun during the day and enjoy the beautiful lights of the playa during the night. The structure is made out of 240 components that are laser cut and fixed together by solid hinges. Each leg of the pavilion would be placed on a wooden base that would then be anchored to the ground.

lion

Elevation8

Inspired by the hypothesis of parallel universes, The Multiverse is a timber pavilion that ultilises curved crease folding system to create a fluid-like body that loops infinitely, aiming to evoke a myriad of moral conundrums. The research first looked into curved crease folding, where by introducing concentric fold lines to a flat surface would allow the surface to bend freely and flexibly. Experiments are done by testing with semi-circular modules, where a closed end loop is introduced to create different resultant forms.

CCF1 CITA Presentation-5 CITA Presentation-12 CITA Presentation-13

Model Photos

In cosmology, parallel universe describes the hypothetical set of infinite possible universes that exist as we make decisions in our lives – with each choice spawning a multitude of universes. In life, we are often met with these choices where we must make our own decisions in order to move on, and over time we have grown to regret and rejoice. Although it is important to realize that the present times only exist the way it does because of the choices we have made, what is more curative to the mind is that we stay true to these decisions – for it matter not what choice we made, but that we made one. We were in control of our own paths, we are, and will always be.

The Multiverse questions the nature of reality. Burners are encouraged to interact with the pavilion by writing on the surface moments of regrets and joy, leaving a piece of themselves together with others; thus they are encouraged to contemplate on their past and present, questioning their beliefs and morality, and gradually fall into a complete moral maze.

 

Multiverse

The Multiverse is constructed of a segments of 4mm plywood components which, when bolted together, forms a series of semi circular surfaces. By applying the principals of curved crease origami, where the fold angles are proportional to the curvature of the resultant surface, the semi-circular surfaces are able to bend into various forms as desired. Consequently, by fixing the hinge angles between the segmented faces, a resultant form can be established.

The pavilion appears to loop infinitely, symbolizing the hypothesis of infinite universes as generated by our decisions in life. Within the pavilion, burners are encouraged to interact with the pavilion by writing on the surface moments of regrets and joy, leaving a piece of themselves. Overtime the pavilion will be a home to emotions, where burners can sympathize one another and at the same time reflect on the self and one’s morality.

At night, the pavilion will be lit by a series of EL wires placed at the fold of the structure, thus further emphasizing the pavilion’s curvatures.

Multiverse Night

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