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Tag Archives: Fractal

Geometry can be found on the smallest of scales, as is proven by the beautiful work of the butterfly in creating her eggs. The butterflies’ metamorphosis is a recognised story, but few know about the start of the journey. The egg from which the caterpillar emerges is in itself a magnificently beautiful object. The tiny eggs, barely visible to the naked eye, serve as home for the developing larva as well as their first meal.

White Royal [Pratapa deva relata] HuDie's Microphotography

White Royal [Pratapa deva relata] HuDie’s Microphotography

shapes copy

Clockwise: Hesperidae, Nymphalidae, Satyridae, Pieridae

Each kind of butterfly has its unique egg design, creating a myriad of beautiful variations.

These are some of the typical shapes that each family produce.

But it is the Lycaenidae family that have the most geometrical and intricate eggs.

lyc

Lycaenidae

Other eggs

Lycaenidae eggs from left to right: Acacia Blue [Surendra vivarna amisena], Aberrant Oakblue [Arhopala abseus], Miletus [Miletus biggsii], Malayan [Megisba malaya sikkima]. HuDie’s Microphotography

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Biomimetics, or biomimicry is an exciting concept that suggests that every field and industry has something to learn from the natural world. The story of evolution is full of problems that have been innovatively solved.

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There are thousands of species of butterfly, each with their unique egg design. 3A truncated icosahedron for a frame, the opposite of a football. Instead of panels pushed out, they are pulled in.

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Fractals are commonly occurring in nature, and can be described as a never-ending pattern on different scales. People are subconsciously familiar with fractals, so are inherently more relaxed when surrounded by them.

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3D Printing is a relatively new technology that is set to change our world. Innovations in the uses of 3D printers, combined with falling costs, means that they could be a ubiquitous tool in every home and industry. 3D printers and scanners are already used a great deal in everything from the biomedical field to art studios, and experiments are currently being done to construct entire homes. This technology is in its infancy, and it is exactly for this reason that every effort should be taken to research its potential. It is common to use 3D printers in architecture to show small working models, I would like to now use it to make a large and complex structure at full scale.

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This research will underpin the design of a sculptural installation in which people can interact with live butterflies. With the ever-declining numbers of butterflies worldwide and in the UK, conservation and education are paramount.

The link between butterflies and humans in our ecosystem is one that is vital and should be conserved and celebrated.

I can imagine an ethereal space filled with dappled light where people can come for contemplation and perhaps their own personal metamorphosis.

Interior

—Tia

Some images of our final cross-crit of the year! Our students presented their Brief03:FutureCities. Have a look at how the next generation of architects envision the future of our cities.

Thank you to Andrei Jipa, Kester Rattenbury and Lindsay Bremner. Final sprint to the portfolio submission and end of year!

Eva Ciocyte - Aral City - As the earth gets too polluted to allow the growth of any edible crop, Aral City attempts to purify the soil progressively by building giant evaporative and inhabitable greenhouses.

Eva Ciocyte – Aral City – As the earth gets too polluted to allow the growth of any edible crop, Aral City attempts to purify the soil progressively by building giant evaporative and inhabitable greenhouses.

Alex Berciu, The Algorithmic City, In the presented scenario, the natural environment in which human beings live today will no longer exist, having been replaced by fully computer generated habitation. As the Earth’s surface will have been largely damaged by pollution and natural disasters, the only  solution for living pushed human society upwards in suspended structures developed through the  technique of extruding concrete and drone assembly. Based on a growth algorithm that evolves with  relation to continuous feedback gathered from climate data, structural qualities and population needs,  the system can perform in any given location. in the generated structure, the algorithm places accordingly a selection of 8 typologies considered  suitable for the needs of the future human society. These are: aliment production/farming, aliment  storage, housing, education hubs, culture hubs, spiritual hubs, places of sin and production  laboratories. Each typology is designed to fit within the modular grid and is placed according to  density and distance rules. The ratio between the 8 typologies is also adaptable, responding to  possible changes in societal needs.

Alex Berciu, The Algorithmic City, In the presented scenario, the natural environment in which human beings live today will no longer exist, having been replaced by fully computer generated habitation. As the Earth’s surface will have been largely damaged by pollution and natural disasters, the only solution for living pushed human society upwards in suspended structures developed through the technique of extruding concrete and drone assembly. Based on a growth algorithm that evolves with relation to continuous feedback gathered from climate data, structural qualities and population needs, the system can perform in any given location. in the generated structure, the algorithm places accordingly a selection of 8 typologies considered suitable for the needs of the future human society. These are: aliment production/farming, aliment storage, housing, education hubs, culture hubs, spiritual hubs, places of sin and production laboratories. Each typology is designed to fit within the modular grid and is placed according to density and distance rules. The ratio between the 8 typologies is also adaptable, responding to possible changes in societal needs.

Marine Pollution has become a growing plaque as plastics are accumulated into patches within the gyres around the world, damaging the marine ecosystem and entering the marine food web. As these plastics are not biodegradable, they continue to pose a threat to the marine wildlife as well as humanity. Centuries into the future, people have begun to seek for ocean colonization in an attempt to tackle marine pollution and the rising sea level. The Fluas is a self-sufficient city that realises the potential of ocean plastics as a source of reusable material. Situated within the North Pacific Gyre and consisting of clusters of floating platforms, the city is centred on the collection and recycling of these materials into elements of the city - in the form of pneumatic structures. As plastics are salvaged from the gyre, the inflated city continues to grow while its inhabitants live a seaborne lifestyle.

Garis Iu – The Inflated City – Marine Pollution has become a growing plaque as plastics are accumulated into patches within the gyres around the world, damaging the marine ecosystem and entering the marine food web. As these plastics are not biodegradable, they continue to pose a threat to the marine wildlife as well as humanity. Centuries into the future, people have begun to seek for ocean colonization in an attempt to tackle marine pollution and the rising sea level. The Fluas is a self-sufficient city that realises the potential of ocean plastics as a source of reusable material. Situated within the North Pacific Gyre and consisting of clusters of floating platforms, the city is centred on the collection and recycling of these materials into elements of the city – in the form of pneumatic structures. As plastics are salvaged from the gyre, the inflated city continues to grow while its inhabitants live a seaborne lifestyle.

Garis Iu The Inflated City

Cidade de Árvores The Atlantic Forest in southern Brazil has long been viewed as a vast quilt of rain forest interspersed by small river outposts. The surging population growth has seen these remote settlements transform this ancient rural vision to an expansive city scale. Cidade de Árvores (City of Trees) envisions an environment where both the city’s infrastructure and its inhabitants maintain a symbiotic relationship with the surrounding natural environment.  Built entirely from locally grown timber, the Cidade de Árvores exists as a network of steam bent beams, joined to form a structural space frame.  Like the forest, the frame is allowed to grow and develop organically over time with inhabitants adding to structure to meet their requirements. The city is powered through the use of micro wind turbine electricity generation which manifests as a series of towers scattered throughout the forest. For the city and the environment to function in harmony, the city access routes manifest as elevated walkways around large courtyards, allowing light to penetrate to the forest floor.

Joe Leach – Cidade de Árvores
The Atlantic Forest in southern Brazil has long been viewed as a vast quilt of rain forest interspersed by small river outposts. The surging population growth has seen these remote settlements transform this ancient rural vision to an expansive city scale. Cidade de Árvores (City of Trees) envisions an environment where both the city’s infrastructure and its inhabitants maintain a symbiotic relationship with the surrounding natural environment. Built entirely from locally grown timber, the Cidade de Árvores exists as a network of steam bent beams, joined to form a structural space frame. Like the forest, the frame is allowed to grow and develop organically over time with inhabitants adding to structure to meet their requirements. The city is powered through the use of micro wind turbine electricity generation which manifests as a series of towers scattered throughout the forest. For the city and the environment to function in harmony, the city access routes manifest as elevated walkways around large courtyards, allowing light to penetrate to the forest floor.

Tobias Power's Infinity Tree for Burning Man development

Tobias Power’s Infinity Tree for Burning Man development

The Infinity Tree - Updated structure with the help of Format Engineers and Ramboll

The Infinity Tree – Updated structure with the help of Format Engineers and Ramboll

This project seeks to develop a response to the combined challenges of natural disasters, the aging population and  over-fishing. All three are closely connected in Japan. In Japan, where life expectancy is one of the highest in the  world, 1 in 3 people will be over 60 by 2050. Unfortunately, Japan is also a country that has been hit by major natural  disasters such as tsunamis, during which the vulnerable elderly suffered the most. Finally, in Japan fish is the main  food source and over fishing may become a major issue in the future. Moreover, Japan has one of the highest  percentages of labour force of people aged 60 and over within the fishing industry. I am proposing a self-sufficient,  resilient city for the super-aging Japanese fishing community along the coast, as a response to these future scenarios.  The structure of the proposal would not only act as a vertical evacuation point, and accommodation for the elderly and  their families, but would also be used as sustainable fish-farming.

The Origami City – Naomi Danos – This project seeks to develop a response to the combined challenges of natural disasters, the aging population and over-fishing. All three are closely connected in Japan. In Japan, where life expectancy is one of the highest in the world, 1 in 3 people will be over 60 by 2050. Unfortunately, Japan is also a country that has been hit by major natural disasters such as tsunamis, during which the vulnerable elderly suffered the most. Finally, in Japan fish is the main food source and over fishing may become a major issue in the future. Moreover, Japan has one of the highest percentages of labour force of people aged 60 and over within the fishing industry. I am proposing a self-sufficient, resilient city for the super-aging Japanese fishing community along the coast, as a response to these future scenarios. The structure of the proposal would not only act as a vertical evacuation point, and accommodation for the elderly and their families, but would also be used as sustainable fish-farming.

Naomi Danos, The Origami City

Naomi Danos, The Origami City

Lorna Jackson presenting her Burning Man proposal and future city for women only.

Lorna Jackson presenting her Burning Man proposal and future city for women only.

Fractal BreakCity will act as defence and breakwater structures against tsunamis and floods.  Benefiting of internalised creation of food, resources and objects, a trade based economy will  emerge, while the cult of product marketing will shrink to its essential.  The city is based on recursive aggregation: one geometry is repeated in a self-similar way to create a  complex looking aggregation, following a fractal pattern. The system consists of one module, with structures of different scales according to their function, so that the bathroom will be the smallest box unit, the bedroom slightly larger and so on. The largest box unit at the center of an aggregated module, will consist of the communal and production based spaces. Cellulose mixed with water, can be 3D printed to create structures stronger than steel and will become structural elements for the city, while aerogel wall components (made of silica, which is found in sand, across the world) will clad each unit’s sides.

Diana Raican – Fractal BreakCity will act as defence and breakwater structures against tsunamis and floods. Benefiting of internalised creation of food, resources and objects, a trade based economy will emerge, while the cult of product marketing will shrink to its essential. The city is based on recursive aggregation: one geometry is repeated in a self-similar way to create a complex looking aggregation, following a fractal pattern. The system consists of one module, with structures of different scales according to their function, so that the bathroom will be the smallest box unit, the bedroom slightly larger and so on. The largest box unit at the center of an aggregated module, will consist of the communal and production based spaces. Cellulose mixed with water, can be 3D printed to create structures stronger than steel and will become structural elements for the city, while aerogel wall components (made of silica, which is found in sand, across the world) will clad each unit’s sides.

Jon Leung's developments on the Bismuth Bivouac for Burning Man

Jon Leung’s developments on the Bismuth Bivouac for Burning Man

Jon Leung's Bismuth Bivouac updated render with latest development with the help of format engineers.

Jon Leung’s Bismuth Bivouac updated render with latest development with the help of format engineers.

John Koning's power generating Ron Resch origami city

John Koning’s power generating Ron Resch origami city

Irina Ghuizan's flying city

Irina Ghuizan’s flying city

Toby Plunket's Silent City in China

Toby Plunket’s Silent City in China

Our WeWantToLearn.net students have submitted their final portfolios! After an inspiring day going through the projects, we gave them a final mark with the help of the other tutors from the University of Westminster. Below is a selection of the inspiring work that was submitted.

The projects range from a temple at the Burning Man Festival made of an unprecedented reciprocal structure (Joe Leach) to a 3D printed city based on a fractal algorithm and built using potato starch-based plastic grown by the inhabitants of Solanopolis (Andrei Jipa) all the way to a Pop-Up plywood mosque for Trafalgar Square (Josh Haywood) and a lace tent for the London Burlesque Festival (Georgia Collard-Watson) as well as a Kabbalah Centre in the City made from large spiralohedron (Jessica Beagleman), our students have explored a new kind of joyful and spiritual Architecture using the latest digital design and fabrication technique.

Joe Leach's Reciprocal Seed Temple for Burning Man

Joe Leach’s Reciprocal Seed Temple for Burning Man

Andrei Jipa's incredible 3D printed collection

Andrei Jipa’s incredible 3D printed collection

Garis Iu's Chanting Bridge for Mont St-Michel

Garis Iu’s Chanting Bridge for Mont St-Michel

Georgia Rose Collard-Watson's tent structure for the Burlesque Festival

Georgia Rose Collard-Watson’s tent structure for the Burlesque Festival

Our beautiful messy studio space full of 1:1 Prototype

Our beautiful DS10 studio space full of 1:1 Prototype

Our beautiful messy studio space full of 1:1 Prototype

Our beautiful  DS10 studio space full of 1:1 Prototype

William Garforth-Bless, Charlotte Yates and Andrei Jipa showing their models in the Diploma Studio 10 space

William Garforth-Bless, Charlotte Yates and Andrei Jipa showing their models in the Diploma Studio 10 space

Solanopolis - Andrei Jipa's 3D printed potato fractal city

Solanopolis – Andrei Jipa’s 3D printed potato fractal city

Solanopolis - Andrei Jipa's 3D printed potato fractal city

Solanopolis – Andrei Jipa’s 3D printed potato fractal city

Solanopolis - Andrei Jipa's 3D printed potato fractal city

Solanopolis – Andrei Jipa’s 3D printed potato fractal city

Solanopolis - Andrei Jipa's 3D printed potato fractal city

Solanopolis – Andrei Jipa’s 3D printed potato fractal city

Solanopolis - Andrei Jipa's 3D printed potato fractal city

Solanopolis – Andrei Jipa’s 3D printed potato fractal city

Solanopolis - Andrei Jipa's 3D printed potato fractal city

Solanopolis – Andrei Jipa’s 3D printed potato fractal city

Solanopolis - Andrei Jipa's 3D printed potato fractal city

Solanopolis – Andrei Jipa’s 3D printed potato fractal city

Solanopolis - Andrei Jipa's 3D printed potato fractal city

Solanopolis – Andrei Jipa’s 3D printed potato fractal city

Solanopolis - Andrei Jipa's 3D printed potato fractal city

Solanopolis – Andrei Jipa’s 3D printed potato fractal city

Solanopolis - Andrei Jipa's 3D printed potato fractal city

Solanopolis – Andrei Jipa’s 3D printed potato fractal city

Solanopolis - Andrei Jipa's 3D printed potato fractal city

Solanopolis – Andrei Jipa’s 3D printed potato fractal city

Josh Haywood's Hayam and Pop-Up Mosque for Trafalgar Square

Josh Haywood’s Hayam and Pop-Up Mosque for Trafalgar Square

Josh Haywood's Hayam and Pop-Up Mosque for Trafalgar Square

Josh Haywood’s Hayam and Pop-Up Mosque for Trafalgar Square

Joe Leach's Reciprocal Seed Temple for Burning Man

Joe Leach’s Reciprocal Seed Temple for Burning Man

Lorna Jackson's Surreal Dali Museum

Lorna Jackson’s Surreal Dali Museum

Mark Simpson's Synthetic Diamond Crematorium

Mark Simpson’s Synthetic Diamond Crematorium

Jessica Beagleman's Kabbalah Centre

Jessica Beagleman’s Kabbalah Centre

Jessica Beagleman's Kabbalah Centre

Jessica Beagleman’s Kabbalah Centre

 

Our studio is back after a month of holidays. Here are couple pictures from our tutorials today. Impressive progress from our students including a 3D printed potato-based fractal civilization (Andrei Jipa), a series of recursive bamboo structures for the Durga Puja festival (Dhiren Patel), an origami roof for the fashion week (Charlotte Yates), a spiky eco-retreat to meet the Sami people (Natasha Coutts), a temple for the Burning Man festival made of reciprocal plywood components (Joe Leach), a hypar tower for the Damyang Bamboo festival (William Garforth-Bless), a Pop-Up book drop pavilion (Ieva Ciocyte), a surreal Dali Museum in the Park (Lorna Jackson), a promenade concert in Hyde Park (Sarah Shuttleworth) and many more… We are so excited by the diversity of projects this year and the clear continuity between our brief2A and brief2B. Looking forward to the final crit on Thursday 15th May!

Andrei Jippa's Fractal 3D Printed Potato Civilization

Andrei Jipa’s Fractal 3D Printed Potato Civilization

Andrei Jippa's Fractal 3D Printed Potato Civilization

Andrei Jipa’s Fractal 3D Printed Potato Civilization

Andrei Jippa's Fractal 3D Printed Potato Civilization

Andrei Jipa’s Fractal 3D Printed Potato Civilization

Joe Leach's Burning Seed Temple for Burning Man

Joe Leach’s Burning Seed Temple for Burning Man

Joe Leach's Burning Seed Temple for Burning Man

Joe Leach’s Burning Seed Temple for Burning Man

Joe Leach's Burning Seed Temple for Burning Man

Joe Leach’s Burning Seed Temple for Burning Man

Ieva Ciocyte's Pop-Up Book drop Project

Ieva Ciocyte’s Pop-Up Book drop Project

Ieva Ciocyte's Pop-Up Book drop Project

Ieva Ciocyte’s Pop-Up Book drop Project

Lorna Jackson Dali Museum Latex Concrete Casting

Lorna Jackson Dali Museum Latex Concrete Casting

Lorna Jackson Dali Museum Latex Concrete Casting

Lorna Jackson Dali Museum Latex Concrete Casting

Dhiren Patels Recursive Bamboo Structures for Durga Puja

Dhiren Patels Recursive Bamboo Structures for Durga Puja

Natasha Coutts Sami Eco-Retreat

Natasha Coutts Sami Eco-Retreat

Natasha Coutts Sami Eco-Retreat

Natasha Coutts Sami Eco-Retreat

Natasha Coutts Sami Eco-Retreat

Natasha Coutts Sami Eco-Retreat

Charlotte Yates Fashion Week Recursive Origami Pavilion

Charlotte Yates Fashion Week Recursive Origami Pavilion

Charlotte Yates Fashion Week Recursive Origami Pavilion

Charlotte Yates Fashion Week Recursive Origami Pavilion

Sarah Shuttleworth promenade concert in Hyde Park

Sarah Shuttleworth promenade concert in Hyde Park

William Garforth-Bless Damyang Bamboo Festival Tower

William Garforth-Bless Damyang Bamboo Festival Tower

 

We’re back from the desert! Very proud to have completed two beautiful projects at the Burning Man festival 2013 with our DS10 students and guests from the Architectural Association, Columbia University and UCL.

Credits to the team:

Team: Toby Burgess and Arthur Mamou-Mani a.k.a. Ratchet and Baby Cup (Project Directors), Thanasis Korras (Designer of Fractal Cult), Georgia Rose Collard-Watson (Designer of Shipwreck), Jessica Beagleman (Food & Meals), Natasha Coutts (Camp and Rentals), Sarah Shuttlesworth, Andy Rixson,  Luka Kreze, Tim Strnad, Philippos Philippidis, Nataly Matathias, Marina Karamali, Harikleia Karamali, Antony Joury, Emma Whitehead, , Jo Cook, Caitlin Hudson, Dan Dodds and Chris Ingram.

Engineers: Ramboll Computational Design (RCD) –  Stephen Melville, Harri Lewis, James Solly

Suppliers: Hess Precision (Plywood Laser Cutting), One-to-Metal, (Metal Punching and Folding), Safway (Scaffolding), West Coast Netting (Netting)

Special Thanks: BettieJune, Ben Stoelting, Kevin Meers, Caroline Holmes, Chloe Brubaker, Papa Bear,

Photos by Jo Cook, Arthur Mamou-Mani, Toby Burgess, Luka Kreze, Thanasis Korras, Antony Joury. 

Back view Just before burning Shipwreck

Back view Just before burning Shipwreck

Front view of the Fractal Cult timber pods and Scaffolding

Front view of the Fractal Cult timber pods and Scaffolding

Here are couple more pictures of the finished projects:

A view of the Shipwreck with the man and a fish Art Car

A view of the Shipwreck with the man and a fish Art Car

Enjoying the sun on the shipwreck - back view

Enjoying the sun on the shipwreck – back view

Three french burners on the hammock

Three french burners on the hammock

A burner relaxing on the Fractal Cult scaffolding

A burner relaxing on the Fractal Cult scaffolding

View of timber pods and festival in background

View of timber pods and festival inbackground

View of timber pods with shipwreck and man in background

View of timber pods with shipwreck and man in background

Interior of the Fractal Cult during Day time

Interior of the Fractal Cult during Day time

Fractal Cult at night time

Fractal Cult at night time

Some images of the construction of Shipwreck, from the collection of the pieces all the way to the assembly

The group in front of Shipwreck

The group in front of Shipwreck

Shipwreck building Burning Man 2013

Construction process, the shipwreck hammock cantilever being erected

Construction process, the shipwreck hammock cantilever being erected

A view of the construction before adding the hammock strips

A view of the construction before adding the hammock strips

Building the shipwreck - finishing the cave part.

Building the shipwreck – finishing the cave part.

All the Shipwreck parts unrolled on the desert floor before assembly

All the Shipwreck parts unrolled on the desert floor before assembly

The shipwreck flat packed in the 24ft truck.

The shipwreck flat packed in the 24ft truck.

Images of the construction process of Fractal Cult until the burn:

Burning Man 2013

Burning Fractal Cult in the Communal Burn

Toby, Luka and Tim assembling the scaffolding for Fractal cult

Toby, Luka and Tim assembling the scaffolding for Fractal cult

Fractal Cult's scaffolding assembly is based on this smaller physical model

Fractal Cult’s scaffolding assembly is based on this smaller physical model

The scaffolding being assembled in the middle of the pods

The scaffolding being assembled in the middle of the pods

Assembling the first pod

Assembling the first pod

The Fractal Cult pods being assembled.

The Fractal Cult pods being assembled.

Getting the ground anchors in for the pods

Getting the ground anchors in for the pods

Getting the scaffolding in the 24ft truck

Getting the scaffolding in the 24ft truck

Finally, how we made our camp look more like a home and less like a refugee camp:

Our camp as it looked at the end

Our camp as it looked at the end

Protecting ourselves from a dust storm!

Protecting ourselves from a dust storm!

Assembling the Hexayurts

Assembling the Hexayurts

The group in our kitchen

The group in our kitchen

One of our two food runs in Reno - Feeding 20 people in the desert.

One of our two food runs in Reno – Feeding 20 people in the desert.

Getting the camp from a lockup in Reno

Getting the camp from a lockup in Reno

A beautiful view of the festival itself at sunrise:

Burning Man Camps and Playa at Sunrise

Burning Man Camps and Playa at Sunrise

Here is a text that we wrote about the experience:

Diploma Studio 10:
Diploma Studio 10 at the University of Westminster is led by Toby Burgess and Arthur Mamou-Mani. They both believe that involvement is key to the process of learning and therefore always try to get their students to “get out and build” their designs in the real world. The studio starts the year with the study of systems, natural, mathematical and architectural systems of all sort, paired with intense software training in order to build up skills and a set of rules to design a small scale project which they will be able to build during a real event in the summer. Throughout the year, they build large scale prototypes and draw very accurate technical drawings, they also need to provide a budget and explain how it makes sense within the wider context of the festival, some of them will event start crowd-funding campaign to self-finance the projects. Our ultimate goal is to give them an awareness of entrepreneurship in Architecture and how to initiate projects as this is for us the best way to fight unemployment in our profession.
Burning Man and the 10 Principles:
The Burning Man festival takes place every summer in Black Rock desert, Nevada. It is a “participant-led” festival in which the activities are initiated by the people attending it. There are around 60,000 “burners” every year building a giant temporary city in which they create a social experiment which follows the 10 principles of Burning Man. They conclude the festival by burning a large sculpture of a Man.
What interested Toby and Arthur are the 10 principle which guide the “burners”: Radical Self-Reliance, Radical Inclusion, Gifting, Leaving No trace, to name a few. Designing with these rules in mind help students understand basic issues of sustainability. Designing for Burning Man also helps the students to design with “playfulness” in mind, as all the structures have to be climbable and interactive. We are not the only one inspired by these rules, Sergei Brin, co-founder of Google, asks all his staff to follow the principles when they come up with new ideas.
The Story:
On our first year at Westminster we found out that our student could submit their Burning Man proposals and receive a grant from the organizers. After receiving 20 submissions from the same school, the organizers were very intrigued and decided to contact us. The director of the Art Grant told us that she loved the project but that all of them were just not possible in the context. She decided to visit us in London to explain what we could do to submit better projects the following year which we did. On the second run, the festival chose two projects, Shipwreck by Georgia Rose Collard-Watson and Fractal Cult by Thanasis Korras.
These two projects are representative of the way we run our studio: Thanasis looked at Fractal on Brief01 and Georgia looked at ways to bend and assemble strips of wood together. They both explored these systems before submitting a project with a very strong narrative which fitted perfectly the burning man philosophy. Thanasis linked his Fractal to the symbol of “Merkaba” whereas Georgia told the story of a shipwreck which offered shelter from the dust storms.
Once the project got chosen, we partnered with an engineer, Ramboll and started researching for suppliers and fabrication facilities in the USA. We took the 3D files from concept all the way parametric models for fabrication. We started a Gantt chart with every step to take from rental of 24ft truck, collection of item all the way to demolition.
One of the main aspect that required a lot of planning was the camp. We had to plan every meal and food that would not perish under the extreme condition. We also found a way to rent a whole camp equipment from past burners.
On site:
The team grew little by little, many of our student could not afford the trip or could not take such a long time off so we asked around if anyone else would like to join us and thanks to our blog posts and active social networking online, students from the Architectural Association, Columbia or UCL started showing interest and joined the team.
Our first surprise on site was the power of the dust storm. One of our Yurt flew away and some of us got stuck in different places of the site seeking shelter. We were terrorised. Sleeping in tents was also extremely hard as you would be awaken by temperatures approaching 40degrees celcius, at the end of the construction, a lot of us would sleep in the foam hexayurts in which we were storing equipment at first.
We learned so much.

Thank you so much everyone – We received funding on Kickstarter You can still help us by donating on our Paypal button:

donate-with-paypal2

The past couple weeks since our last updates were very busy. We have sent all the fabrication files to our contact next to San Francisco. To make sure the files were alright we had several meetings with our engineers and made a lot of physical tests.

The team has shrunk so if you are keen to join us from the 18th August until the 6th September,you can email us at info@WeWantToLearn.net

A special thanks to Harri Lewis, Stephen Melville and James Solly from Ramboll Computational Design (RCD) for their precious help all along!

Here are couple updates on the projects:

SHIPWRECK

Shipwreck final files sent to fabrication - Updated Render - Note: The sail and light might change

Shipwreck final files sent to fabrication – Updated Render 1 – Note: The sail and light might change – File by Georgia Collard-Watson, Arthur Mamou-Mani , Chris Ingram and Toby Burgess

Shipwreck final files sent to fabrication - Updated Render - Note: The sail and light might change

Shipwreck final files sent to fabrication – Updated Render 2 – Note: The sail and light might change – File by Georgia Collard-Watson, Arthur Mamou-Mani , Chris Ingram and Toby Burgess

Shipwreck final files sent to fabrication - Updated Render - Note: The sail and light might change

Shipwreck final files sent to fabrication – Updated Render 3 – Note: The sail and light might change – File by Georgia Collard-Watson, Arthur Mamou-Mani , Chris Ingram and Toby Burgess

Shipwreck - Fabrication Files

Shipwreck – Fabrication Files – File by Georgia Collard-Watson, Arthur Mamou-Mani , Chris Ingram and Toby Burgess

6mm wood bending tests

6mm wood bending tests – Does it bend enough? Study by Georgia Collard-Watson

Maximum Radius on wood structure

Maximum Radius on wood structure – Study by Georgia Collard-Watson

Ramboll Structural Analysis - showing new location for  ropes

Ramboll Structural Analysis by Harri Lewis – showing new location for ropes

Ramboll Structural Analysis - showing new location for  ropes

Ramboll Structural Analysis by Harri Lewis – showing new location for ropes

FRACTAL CULT

Extract from the Fractal Cult Assembly Sequence by Dan Dodds after feedback from Harri Lewis

Extract from the Fractal Cult Assembly Sequence by Dan Dodds after feedback from Harri Lewis

Click Here to see the full Assembly Sequence Diagrams

Extract from the Fractal Cult Fabrication Files from Dan Dodds

Extract from the Fractal Cult Fabrication Files from Dan Dodds

Cost Savings - New dimensions of the Fractal Cult

Cost Savings – New dimensions of the Fractal Cult – Study by Thanasis Korras and Toby Burgess

Fractal Cult's new scale and new netting strategy

Fractal Cult’s new scale and new netting strategy – Study by Thanasis Korras and Toby Burgess

Fractal Cult's new scale and new netting strategy

Fractal Cult’s new scale and new netting strategy – – Study by Thanasis Korras and Toby Burgess

Fractal Cult scaffolding test model

Fractal Cult scaffolding test model – Study by Thanasis Korras and Toby Burgess

Fractal Cult scaffolding test model

Fractal Cult scaffolding test model – Study by Thanasis Korras and Toby Burgess

Toby presenting the Scaffolding Structure at Ramboll

Toby presenting the Scaffolding Structure at Ramboll – Picture taken by Harri Lewis

Couple pictures from our latest tutorials and crits. Thank you to Tommaso Franzolini, Miriam Dall’Igna, Colin Ball, Karl Kjelstrup-Johnson, Magnus Larsson, Jack Munro and Savvas Havatzias for the very helpful comments on our last cross-crit.

Jake Alsop's Temple for Bees

Jake Alsop’s Temple for Bees

Josh Haywood's Prism Prison

Josh Haywood’s Prism Prison

Andrei Jippa's fractals

Andrei Jippa’s fractals

Andrei Jippa 3d printed fractal

Andrei Jippa 3d printed fractal

Michael Clarke's Reciprocal Structure

Michael Clarke’s Reciprocal Structure

Michael Clarke's Reciprocal Structure

Michael Clarke’s Reciprocal Structure